Full Time OKA Nomads

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01 Nov 2012 15:55 - 01 Nov 2012 15:57 #1 by dandjcr
dandjcr created the topic: Full Time OKA Nomads
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Tony
Member
Posts: 11
Hi to ALL
I am interested in what rigs are being used by full time OKA travellers (if any). What size caravans (if any) are being towed and how satisfacory is the rig you have. What are the benefits and draw backs? What budget do you run on? etc etc
April 14, 2012 at 8:57 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Garry & Chris
Member
Posts: 104
G'day Tony we are about to go down that path As of 1st of May this year the Oka LT will be our home.
For 1st 12 months we will be towing a off road camper But not for our use For 2 ppl we are picking up in Broome in August
April 14, 2012 at 9:58 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Pete Fox
Member
Posts: 140
Tony
We have OKA 266, an LT that is pretty standard apart from a Nissan Transfer Case being fitted. We are towing a Kimberley Karavan, (2200 kg) giving us an all up weight of about 7000kg.
In my view this is about the practical limit weight wise for towing with an Oka in any hilly country. Bigger,vans may be OK in flat going. We can cruise at 80 kmh, but hills give us a fair bit of a punishing and the conga line behind grows at an alarming rate. Providing you aren't in a hurry the Oka is great. The weight of an Oka also seems to keep a van under control in rough/slippery going. I had the van in a bit of a slide the other day at about 60kmh on a ball bearing sandy road and it hardly moved the Oka.
I am still doing fuel economy tests, but indications are that the Oka gets about the same economy as my previous Nissan Patrol 4.2, pulling the same van albeit at a slower pace.
The benefits for us is mainly about space. We have a multicab and we now have room to move. No more standing in in the shopping centre car park in the rain packing away the groceries, just pile it on the cab and do it at camp
The other benefit is the view, cab overs give you a view of the road and the off-road like nothing else,and nobody tries to cut us off. Other road users give us a wide berth.
Pete
--
Peter Fox

OKA 266 Multi-cab.

Photobucket album



April 14, 2012 at 10:17 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter_n_Margaret
Member
Posts: 198
We spent 2005 to 2009 (5 years) travelling in OKA196 for 8 to 9 month each year.
Full time would have been quite OK, but it is a little bigger and certainly better equipped than most.
Stunning vehicle to explore Oz in.
Total costs for the vehicle were about $12k pa, including extensive maintenance due to some of the tough work we put it through.
The only thing we tow is a boat, sometimes.
--
Cheers Peter, OKA196 Motorhome. www.oka4wd.com/xt196.htm



April 14, 2012 at 1:21 PM Flag Quote & Reply

chris @ shirley james
Member
Posts: 18
Garry & Chris at April 14, 2012 at 9:58 AM
G'day Tony we are about to go down that path As of 1st of May this year the Oka LT will be our home.
For 1st 12 months we will be towing a off road camper But not for our use For 2 ppl we are picking up in Broome in August
Hello Tony,we have an XT,#96, pretty well standard power wise,dual cab with lock up canopy on the back which carries our quad bike and our propecting gear as prospecting is one of our major interests. We tow a 17ft Trakmaster caravan,off road model so the weight is up there especialy when loaded with 300lts water and food for 3 months.It is slow but why rush,you miss too much the other way.Hates hills as they all do.Very stable when towing.We have air bags all round and no special load leveling hitch for the van. Retired a month ago,packing now,off in a couple of weeks. LOVE IT....
Regards Chris.
--
April 14, 2012 at 2:58 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
Am I missing something here? Not having a go at anyone but reading the Oka specifications they can have either a 5,500kg or 6,000kg GVM, tow a max of 1500kg and the GCM can be no more than 7,000kg.
So while you can have a GCM of 7000kg ONLY 1500kg can be towed legally, maybe physically as that is all the towbar on 374 is rated at.
So have you fella's had your Oka's reengineered to be able to tow far higher
weights?
If not then your setups would not be legal?
--
Oka 374 LT Van

April 15, 2012 at 7:20 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Pete Fox
Member
Posts: 140
Peter
266 has a towbar rating of 3500kg. This is the standard OKA rating, engraved onto a plate on the towbar.
I am trying to keep the GVM below 5 tonnes so I don't go past the 7000kg GCM that Oka recommend. My modified compliance plate says 8400kg, so I am legal in any case.
Pete
--
Peter Fox

OKA 266 Multi-cab.

Photobucket album



April 15, 2012 at 7:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
374's owners manual and the towbar both state max 1500kg towing capacity with a GVM of 6000kg and GCM of 7000kg
--
Oka 374 LT Van

April 15, 2012 at 7:54 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Pete Fox
Member
Posts: 140
Hi Peter
I have just dragged out the original Operators Manual. There is no set limit in it for Gross Trailer Mass (GTM). all it says is that GVM + GTM =GCM which is 7000kg.
I think that maybe the RAAF had some special build or a downrated towbar
My towbar was made by Parkside Manufacturing Co and has an OKA part number 004789 engraved on it
Towball equipped rating 2270kg
Pintle equipped rating 3500kg
GCM 7000kg
Pete

--
Peter Fox

OKA 266 Multi-cab.

Photobucket album



April 15, 2012 at 8:15 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Rick Whitworth
Member
Posts: 74
Engraved plate on #149's towbar has same manufacturer, OKA part no and specs as #260
50 mm BALL - 2270 kg
PINTLE HOOK - 3500 kg
GCM 7000 kg
Most manufacturer's towing capcities are conservative
Intend to tow a runabout but have not towed with #149 at all yet. With the way it drives, I expect it to tow very well compared to standard 4WD.
Have towed off road vans behind Pajero's with 4 kids on board for the last 20 years. I am interested to test how well the OKA can pull the van, should do very well, but as #149 will be self sufficient our whole idea is to leave the van behind.
Rick

April 15, 2012 at 2:32 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Robert & Shirley
Member
Posts: 8
Hi Tony
Oka 9 for us is the greatest weve been home in Mandurah WA since 12 Dec and Thurs 19 April we will be up up and away back to Brisbane to ours to head off again for 4 months only. Have family comitments but mid Nov we will we hope be flying to Adelaide where our oka will be stored. We started our trip back in Nov 2009. We fly home as is cheaper and we get back asap. We love it on the road, do lots of walking and of coarse talking. Meeting so many fantastic people and many we over the years have called on and having fun doing so. We dont tow anything even though we are set up with it. As you can see we have a bed that falls out the side giving us heaps of inner space. We certainly dont get in each others way. We have a shower we set up outside and use sola bags. Have porta loo inside dont need for anything else. Have solar panels to run a 190lt fridge which has 40 lt of freezer. One thing we do is look out for our oka mates an d not seeing many so hope we do better this time. We spent 7 weeks in Tassie2012. We built camper ourselves and are proud of ourselves and have about 1500 kms to get to 100,000 kms. We if health allows it hope to get in at least another 5 yrs of travelling its the greatest thing ever.
Hope I didnt bore you

Rob Shirl
April 15, 2012 at 4:23 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
Had a closer look at the towbar, it is the same as yours, made by Parkside, had the same ratings as yours on the plate that had an additional sticker over it with the lower figures on it, now been removed ;-))
--
Oka 374 LT Van

April 15, 2012 at 4:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

frank
Member
Posts: 59
I have a question for all you Oka nomads too.
Is the air conditioner needed? or is it a luxury that is nice to have yet not really necessary.

Particularly interested in any comments about the rear a/c unit - keep or ditch?

Ditching both a/c will free up space around the engine, particularly ditching the rear unit would allow for some storage to be located behind the passenger front wheel (nice almost empty spot there).
thanks,
--
Frank & Christine Thomas

April 16, 2012 at 3:37 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Frank, it sounds like your a/c might be a bit different to ours. Apart from a few pipes we have no a/c parts behind the passengers front wheel. In fact I've used that space for a 3rd battery.
If you are referring to the normal engine driven a/c for the front cab, then yes it is a must for travelling in the north or outback parts of the country.
With only 2 people, the rear cabin a/c is not so useful but you can redirect it's air outlet to the front and greatly improve the cabin cooling.
We live in our Oka bus/motorhome for several months each year and I fitted a cut down evaporative a/c in the rear for use when the engine is not running. It takes much less power than a compressor model but is not so useful in humid conditions and needs the windows open (with fly screens).

--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

April 16, 2012 at 5:03 PM Flag Quote & Reply

frank
Member
Posts: 59
David, it was those few pipes I was thinking about, mine diagonally cross that space. If they were longer I could move them out of the way.
Sounds like 1 vote to keep the a/c, I was thinking that with the large window areas the Oka has it might be practically ineffective at cooling. Good to hear that it makes a difference. Thanks for response.
--
Frank & Christine Thomas

April 16, 2012 at 8:06 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Frank, on the contrary, the cab of an Oka is more shady and cooler than most cars with deeply sloping windscreens.
However the front a/c is hobbled by having a fairly small evaporator and a lot of steel channels that the air has to pass though which sap the cooling effect (I'm speaking of an XT, an LT may be better designed).
The rear a/c in a bus model is very much more efficient and powerful and is why it's very useful to redirect the cool air back to the cab (see pics here).
Improving sound and heat insulation in the cabin, around the engine in particular, and fitting window screens when not travelling can substantially help keep the cabin cool (or warm).
Our 3rd battery mounted behind the passengers seat but there's still plenty of unused space in there.


--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

April 16, 2012 at 11:20 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
Another vote for keeping the rear a/c and redirecting it to the front, it makes abig difference on really hot humid days and actually keeps the whole interior from heating up so when you stop to camp the interior isn't baking hot already.
Our rear a/c pipes are tucked well over in the corner of that compartment and the compressor and 11 litre air tank take up most of the space.
--
Oka 374 LT Van

April 17, 2012 at 7:43 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
After a hard day's driving, the transmission/diff components can get very hot and that heat is transmitted though the floor of the rear cab. Road heat also radiates upwards to the rear floor.
Since we live in the rear motorhome section, this can keep the rear unpleasantly hot even with windows open and fans on, but I don't know how to avoid this effect. Underfloor reflective paint or insulation would work in theory but it's difficult to apply and would quickly get dirty. Does anyone have any ideas??
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

April 17, 2012 at 8:43 AM Flag Quote & Reply

frank
Member
Posts: 59
2 votes for keeping the a/c. Looks like it stays put, better find out if it works now.
wrt insulation I am considering trying this paint for the exterior of the vehicle.
www.thermoshieldqld.com.au/
Not cheap $325 for 15litre (coverage 30m2) which should just do the Oka.
No experience with it as yet, but possibly worthy of consideration. Can't see any reason why It shouldn't work on the underside (after a good degreasing so It can stick). However it is only a small layer of insulation. Fixing some thin metal heatshields would be the first thing to try for radiated heat. Heatshields work by capturing the radiated energy and then reradiating it in both directions, so an instant 50% reduction in radiation hitting the floor. This is the reason a cloudy night sky is hotter than a clear night sky, the clouds reradiate the earths radiated energy back to earth. So yes the components creating the heat will get hotter, airflow over these should limit this increase. Anyone want to try bolting aluminium heatsinks to their transmission and exhaust pipe? Is anyone monitoring gearbox/transfer case oil temperatures?
--
Frank & Christine Thomas

April 17, 2012 at 10:20 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony
Member
Posts: 11
frank at April 17, 2012 at 10:20 AM
2 votes for keeping the a/c. Looks like it stays put, better find out if it works now.
wrt insulation I am considering trying this paint for the exterior of the vehicle.
www.thermoshieldqld.com.au/
Not cheap $325 for 15litre (coverage 30m2) which should just do the Oka.
No experience with it as yet, but possibly worthy of consideration. Can't see any reason why It shouldn't work on the underside (after a good degreasing so It can stick). However it is only a small layer of insulation. Fixing some thin metal heatshields would be the first thing to try for radiated heat. Heatshields work by capturing the radiated energy and then reradiating it in both directions, so an instant 50% reduction in radiation hitting the floor. This is the reason a cloudy night sky is hotter than a clear night sky, the clouds reradiate the earths radiated energy back to earth. So yes the components creating the heat will get hotter, airflow over these should limit this increase. Anyone want to try bolting aluminium heatsinks to their transmission and exhaust pipe? Is anyone monitoring gearbox/transfer case oil temperatures?
Hi Frank
This paint sounds very much the same or similar to a paint I used some time ago. Does it keep things cool? yes it does but you must be aware of the following'
1. It really only works for white colour. If pastel shades are used the effectiveness falls away and its thermal properties decrease rapidly if darker colours are used.
2.Any dust or dirt accumulating on the outside surface decreases its effect.
3.It became a problem when used on roofs of houses (and the same thing would apply to your OKA roof) in that the outside of the roof becomes cooler than the inside and considerable amounts of condensation form on the inside.
Hope this is useful, the product I used was called "Hecatec" I think and it was a plastic paint. It is not insulation but reflects the UV rays At the time I considered a paint which was pure insulation and very thick. My landcruiser is always cool as I have a full length roof rack with a 3 ply floor.
Regards Tony
April 17, 2012 at 2:46 PM



Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Thanks for your input Frank, yes heat shields would work while moving to reduce radiant heat although difficult to fit, but when parked, its convected heat upwards which keeps things warm. OK in Tassie but not in the tropics.
We do live outside a lot when conditions are right but insect pests drive us inside eventually. Suzi and Ruedi's idea is a good one: hang a bright light in a tree well away from the camp site to lure insects away.
Re paint, as your Oka appears to be white already, I would put more effort into sound proofing the front cabin. Carpeting all metal surfaces and doubling the insulation thickness around the engine covers (and the gear controls box) makes a lot of difference sound and heat-wise. We use foil-backed sound insulation from Whitworths.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

April 17, 2012 at 6:03 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
David,
I have yet to add carpet under the seats and anywhere else - but have covered the whole back wall with the perforated foam when I renewed the ceiling - so I wondered what sort of carpet you used. and whether you glued it to vertical surfaaces. Seems logical to use some sort of outdoor carpet - maybe the ribbed charcoal one - but thinking about it, it may be better to use something a lot heavier even if not so durable. I have the ribbed outdoor carpet, but neighbour has a shed full of shag pile carpet of very non-descript colour that might last one trip and could then be binned with few regrets.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

April 17, 2012 at 7:46 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
To answer the OP. We are full-time Grey Nomads and have been for about 5 years. Not all in the OKA of course, but I have just spend a few busy months building something similar to Peter & Margaret's rig - to replace the much smaller camper shown in my avatar.
Because we are full-time, it naturally follows that we are living in what serves as our house. This means that privations that might be bearable for a month become completely unbearable within a short time. At the risk of stereotyping, the blokes can tinker or grease a shackle pin or grab a beer and go talk to someone else - leaving the better half to try and keep up some semblance of normalcy in less than optimum domestic situation. This is the main factor that results in long-planned retirement lifestyle on the road coming to an abrupt end the instant she gets back in a regular house - never to leave.
This is why we smart men make room for an indoor shower, an indoor toilet, decent kitchen area, a bed that is alway made up, a breadmaker, a microwave, heating and a reasonable amount of storage and refrigerator space. Not because we NEED them, but because we know our partners WANT them.

Aircon? Today was a bit humid and the windsceen misted up in a few minutes. Turning the dash aircon on with full heat as well and high fan did just about nothing.
Turned the modified crew cab unit on - which has 4 swivel outlets on the back wall - and the windscreen cleared instantly. Same in hot weather. Cab unit makes the engine work harder so it heats up more so the cab actually heats up when you turn on the aircon. Add the crewcab unit in the equation and things aare much, much cooler. The crew cab unit runs off the same compressor as the dash air so it is quite different to the bus unit.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

April 17, 2012 at 7:59 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
Tony our bus unit runs off the same compressor as the dash unit but as you say makes a huge difference to cooling capacity.
--
Oka 374 LT Van

April 17, 2012 at 8:26 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony
Member
Posts: 11
Tony Lee at April 17, 2012 at 7:59 PM
To answer the OP. We are full-time Grey Nomads and have been for about 5 years. Not all in the OKA of course, but I have just spend a few busy months building something similar to Peter & Margaret's rig - to replace the much smaller camper shown in my avatar.
Because we are full-time, it naturally follows that we are living in what serves as our house. This means that privations that might be bearable for a month become completely unbearable within a short time. At the risk of stereotyping, the blokes can tinker or grease a shackle pin or grab a beer and go talk to someone else - leaving the better half to try and keep up some semblance of normalcy in less than optimum domestic situation. This is the main factor that results in long-planned retirement lifestyle on the road coming to an abrupt end the instant she gets back in a regular house - never to leave.
This is why we smart men make room for an indoor shower, an indoor toilet, decent kitchen area, a bed that is alway made up, a breadmaker, a microwave, heating and a reasonable amount of storage and refrigerator space. Not because we NEED them, but because we know our partners WANT them.

Aircon? Today was a bit humid and the windsceen misted up in a few minutes. Turning the dash aircon on with full heat as well and high fan did just about nothing.
Turned the modified crew cab unit on - which has 4 swivel outlets on the back wall - and the windscreen cleared instantly. Same in hot weather. Cab unit makes the engine work harder so it heats up more so the cab actually heats up when you turn on the aircon. Add the crewcab unit in the equation and things aare much, much cooler. The crew cab unit runs off the same compressor as the dash air so it is quite different to the bus unit.
Hi
Sounds like you have set up very well indeed. Can you tell me what deep cycle battery capacity you carry and also what brand and capacity generator? Can you comment on the "Webasto" (spelling?) appliances you have , if any.
Regards Tony
April 17, 2012 at 8:37 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Thanks Peter - I hadn't gone into details of the bus unit. Just assumed it would be stand alone to get the required capacity.

Tony, Don't carry a generator and there is no permanent shore power connection either although I do admit to carrying a cheap battery charger so I can boost supplies if we get stuck in a caravan park for days of rainy weather as happened last time. Do have a generator - rarely used though - in the 40' bus I converted to a motorhome, and the US motorhome has a medium size Onan, but both those are quite different to the OKA. The other smaller MH in Europe has mostly LPG stuff but has a couple of solar panels and about 220Ah of Gel batteries and we bush camp for weeks at a time in that - ie 4 weeks in Iceland and only a couple of nights hooked up to mains. The point is you don't necessarily have to have huge amounts of power but it is nice to have as it gives you more options. Peter & Margaret also don't carry a generator and since his rig is not much different to mine in size, the reason is that there just isn't enough room to waste it on something we would likely never use. Last trip was around three months across the simpson, Alice area and hay River track and although we did hole up in campgrounds at White cliffs, Alice and at the end of the trip at Birdsville, it was only because the roads out were closed and we didn't have a lot of choice. If the roads had been opened, just about the whole time would have been without mains power.

520Ah of battery, about 360W of solar panel - so isn't really balanced. Have a 30 amp DC-DC charger so when we are doing some driving at least every couple of days or so, we are generally OK for power.
Choice of batteries was a bit arbitrary. Just that the bus is on blocks and serves as our home base and has 4 x 260Ah batteries so I pinched two and installed them in the OKA. They do add a lot of weight though - about 80kg each but serve nicely to counterbalance the kitchedn where all the main storage is.
Webasto heating is the Thermotop - heats coolant which is then circulated to heat water in a 20 litre calorifier and/or the interior via three fan radiator units and/or preheat the engine for an easy start in cold weather. Also can be run so the engine heats thge hot water and also supplies the fan heaters so the interior is nice and warm when you stop. Seems to do exactly the job we want it to.
Diesel cooktop is maybe an acquired taste but Betty is quite happy with it. Basically a two-burner cooktop, it does take a few minutes getting up to temoperature, but once you get used to it the basic meat and three veg meal is no problem.

We do have an electric kettle used for the roadside coffee stops. Supplied from the same 1500 W sinewave inverter that runs the microwave and the breadmaker. A smaller 300W inverter (both sinewave units) supplies the satellite internet system, TV and satellite TV system, computers, bits and pieces like phone chargers and the electric blankets. not all at the same time of course.

If you do choose to go mostly solar, you do need to do the job properly. A realistic appraisal of your electrical needs, installation of the right amount of batteries charged by the right amount of solar panel plus auxiliary charging from the engine alternator. No need to go crazy and buy top of the line name brands though - except perhaps for batteries, but you do need to instal a large enough system that you can be off the grid for very extended periods. Hard to half do the job and be satisfied. Solar panels are very cheap and the 24V units can be married to an MPPT controller (I use a Rogue unit bought from the US but there are cheaper onbes available). Inverters - you can spend big money on a fancy brand that might fail just out of warranty - as they do - or a $150 unit that might go forever. All LED lights - also pretty cheap - will give you good light at low power use and now you have a decent choice of colour temperature.

Refrigeration is one area where you will get plenty of argument. If you avoid LPG then you don't have a choice except to use 12V compressor fridges. I use a couple of waecos - one as fridge and the other as freezer but there are a couple of much smarter methods using remote compressor units and eutectic plate systems mounted in homemade cabinets as Peter and Paul have done/is doing. They can be far more efficient than my clunky Waecos, but do take a bit of 'engineering' to do properly.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

April 17, 2012 at 11:27 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Tony, re carpeting and sound/heat proofing, where it's not noticeable or walked on, I've reused the Oka black vinyl covered foam harvested from roof panels and other areas. It does crumble though and leaves little piles of black crumbs.

For underneath/exposed areas (eg engine cover, gear control panel, floors and other panels) I used the Whitworths foil-backed sound proofing sheets, often on top of existing Oka soundproofing to give double layers, held on with self-adhesive aluminium tape.

For interior panelling I first stuck on a layer of thin closed cell foam (1cm thick camping mat rolls from Reject Shops or similar) using contact adhesive, and then covered it with Wonderwall (also called FrontRunner), a thick, light, nylon car headlining type material which we got from Spotlight. It's tough, easy to use, looks good and can be washed/scrubbed down. Outdoor carpet would work fine but it might be a bit heavy.

Between panels and inside doors I've stuffed the spaces with polyester ceiling insulation (not fibreglass).

When parked, we have window shades made from Aircell aluminium bubble pack insulation from Bunnings for all the windows, held on by suckers. They keep heat, light and sound out (or in) very effectively.

The overall result is that the front cabin is fairly quiet and soft since nearly all the metalwork is covered, and engine heating is kept to a minimum. Heat though the rear floor (3/4 inch ply) is our biggest problem after a long drive.

There was a bit of discussion on sound proofing in this thread.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

April 18, 2012 at 3:55 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Garry & Chris at April 14, 2012 at 9:58 AM
G'day Tony we are about to go down that path As of 1st of May this year the Oka LT will be our home.
For 1st 12 months we will be towing a off road camper But not for our use For 2 ppl we are picking up in Broome in August
If the camper is following you across the Simpson and the CSR, it should make for an interesting trip one way and another.
Just make sure you can reverse it 60 metres back down a narrow winding track in deep sand on a steep dune face - without once getting off-line enough to need to pull forward to straighten up (because you won't be able to pull forward.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

April 28, 2012 at 9:28 PM Flag Quote & Reply

len&rina
Member
Posts: 38
Hi Tony,
Rina & I have been on the road 9years.20months of those in the Oka.Lack of space is the biggest issue.208 is a high roof which allows light item storage,like clothes for the different climates.Next is power,we have 520watts solar &520amps battery.A 140ltr waeco fridge & 26ltr chest freezer.The problem comes with hot weather and cloudy skies,as we may sit for 2 or 3 weeks at a time a genny becomes necessary at some time.We have used it perhaps 10-15 times but if the fridges go off,nasty.
We do about 10-12000k a year at 70-75ks an hour,giving 7ks a ltr.No rush when permanent,and slow enough to pull over to let traffic by.
We are having a great time and hope to see you on the road less travelled.Regards
--


May 2, 2012 at 1:36 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Greg #210 and Dean #366
Member
Posts: 58
A good quality genny Helps heaps we run a 60 and 45 ltr Engel one as a freezer for mine it is not worth the rick to loose tucker or worse end up with warm grog.
--
May 2, 2012 at 3:18 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony
Member
Posts: 11
len&rina at May 2, 2012 at 1:36 PM
Hi Tony,
Rina & I have been on the road 9years.20months of those in the Oka.Lack of space is the biggest issue.208 is a high roof which allows light item storage,like clothes for the different climates.Next is power,we have 520watts solar &520amps battery.A 140ltr waeco fridge & 26ltr chest freezer.The problem comes with hot weather and cloudy skies,as we may sit for 2 or 3 weeks at a time a genny becomes necessary at some time.We have used it perhaps 10-15 times but if the fridges go off,nasty.
We do about 10-12000k a year at 70-75ks an hour,giving 7ks a ltr.No rush when permanent,and slow enough to pull over to let traffic by.
We are having a great time and hope to see you on the road less travelled.Regards
Hi Len
The most impressive item I have ever owned is a "Trailblaza" 12V fridge from Nor Coast Refrigeration at Caloundra Qld. I have had mine or 24yrs without missing a beat. Heat dissapation is accomplished by gluing the copper pipes to the inside of the outer skin of the fridge with no joints to leak internally. Insulation is 75mm therefore uses miles less amp hours than the Engels and Waecos. These fridges are are not sold thru retail outlets (see web page). For a freezer their 125mm insulatation model is outstanding and is avaible up to 200litres, this model runs on next to no amps. They are that rugged that they are strapped to the back of Abraham tanks.
These are serious low draw items all running on either 240V or 12V.
Nice to hear from you . I envy your freedom and wish you all the best
Tony
May 2, 2012 at 5:17 PM Flag Quote & Reply

David and Janet Ribbans - Oka 148
Oka148 profile here.
Visit our technical and travel blogs: here.
Last Edit: 01 Nov 2012 15:57 by dandjcr.

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