Hi-Lift Jack and Exhaust Jack

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01 Nov 2012 14:48 #1 by dandjcr
dandjcr created the topic: Hi-Lift Jack and Exhaust Jack
Forum Home > On the Road > Hi-Lift Jack and Exhaust Jack
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OKA4WD.com
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From Seamus & Cate:

Hi
Which Hi-Lift Jacks are recommended for OKAs? Most seem to not have enough lifting capacity.
And exhaust jacks - all the ones I've researched are designed for a GVM of 4 tonnes - anyone using them?
Ta
Seamus & Cate
June 16, 2010 at 10:23 PM Flag Quote & Reply

OKA4WD.com
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Posts: 412
From Peter_n_Margaret:

Hi Seamus & Cate,
Neither are much use.
Front is OK for a highlift, but most vehicles are unsuitable at the rear.
In any case, many vehicles are too heavy if loaded too.
Same applies to exhaust jacks. The underside of the OKA is simply unsuitable.
We (and many others) go for a two-stage hydraulic jack & wood baseplate.
"Toolex" is a cheap brand that seems OK.
I have a six-tonne that is fine. They also make a nine-tonne, I think, for about $100 retail.
Cheers,
Peter.
June 16, 2010 at 10:25 PM Flag Quote & Reply

OKA4WD.com
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Posts: 412
From David Ribbans:

Seamus,
You definitely need some way of lifting a heavy Oka right off the ground (if you need to remove a spring for example).
Exhaust jacks are no good, they need a smooth under surface which the Oka does not have, and are dangerous if you need to get under the vehicle.
I have a high lift jack (you must get the longest version otherwise you can't get sufficient lift, and it must be the strongest available). I have the 60 inch US Hi-Lift brand (the original type, tested to 7000lbs) available from ARB, plus a base plate.
I can (and have) used it on the front and rear since I have bull bars at both ends with reinforced jacking points. If you don't have fixings they can be added to the chassis.
I also take a heavy duty screw jack, double acting (which you need to get it under the axle with a flat tyre but still get the wheels off the ground). Could be hydraulic, but I already had screw type. Plus two x 3-tonne axle stands for safety.
I have investigated air/hydraulic jacks to reduce the work load (they can use compressed air or manual pumping to operate) but they are rare in Australia although common in the US. I'm not sure there is a double acting version either.
I also have a Hub Jack Adaptor which fits over the hub and allows the wheel to be lifted from the outside. This would be useful if the wheel is bogged for example since it doesn't require you to scrabble underneath the vehicle locating a jack.
I have considered a rattle gun to remove the wheel nuts but I don't think there is one light enough and powerful enough to make it worthwhile. A really tough wheel brace is a good investment though, Oka nuts at 160 ft-lbs can take some shifting.
Regards,
Dave Ribbans
June 16, 2010 at 10:27 PM Flag Quote & Reply

OKA4WD.com
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Posts: 412
From Corey Thomson:

The last time I replaced my main leaf springs in the front I cable-winched off a tree nice and easy.
The rest of the time a plywood 400mm diameter 25mm thick base plate and a 10-tonne hydraulic bottle jack; it lifts about 300mm. We always carry extra hardwood blocks 100x75mm, 200mm long, if we need more height.
Corey
June 16, 2010 at 10:30 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul & Sue Crompton
Member
Posts: 44
Has anyone had much success using the Hi-Lift 7000 lb (USA) jack on Okas? I have a hub adapter and have tried it and it seems to be really struggling and this is only lifting one wheel whilst the vehicle is empty. My full pack weight is around 5.5 tonne. I have used the Hi-Lift jack on many occasions on other vehicles and found it really comes in handy but the Oka just seems too heavy for it. Perhaps the Toolex 9 tonne maybe the way to go. If you get a chance, Peter, can you tell me where I can purchase one. Any other suggestions would be great.

PS – Peter and Margaret – have you gone overseas yet?

Bye for now
--
Paul & Sue Crompton

June 30, 2010 at 11:31 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
I've got the ARB jack - tallest model - and it has no problems lifting my OKA at 5 1/2 tonnes either using the poorly=placed points on the bull bar or the hitch receiver at the back or using the rope rails on the tray.
--
Tony

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July 1, 2010 at 2:05 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul & Sue Crompton
Member
Posts: 44
Thanks for the reply Tony, I will give it another try. If I remember rightly the Hi-Lift did have a shearing pin so it shouldn't do any damage and I will just put a bit more effort into it. Paul.
--
Paul & Sue Crompton

July 2, 2010 at 3:05 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
ARB will tell you (unofficially of course) that the ratings of the jack are much higher than specified because of some requirement under Australian regulations. Maybe it was David who posted that it was associated with the strength of the handle rather than the jack itself. Suggestion was to look at the ratings given on the US (???) website.

As always - use of these jacks seems to be inherantly dangerous so ...



From the US site

Important! During lifting and lowering, the weight of the load pushes up against the jack’s handle. If your hands slip off the handle, or if the handle is horizontal when you move the reversing latch, it may move up very quickly.
Raising an infated tire more than 2” (5cm) above the ground or attempting to lift more than one wheel at a time may result in tip over, unexpected movement and serious injury or death.
Always raise an infated tire less than 2” (5cm) and only one tire at a time.
Handle force required to raise 4,660 lbs. is 177 lbs. at 34” on the handle. Maximum rated load is 4,660 lbs. (2273 kg) up to 48” (121 cm), tested to 7,000 lbs. (3175 kg). Upper 12” of 60” jack is rated to 2,660 lbs. (1209 kg) only, tested to 4,000 lbs. (1818 kg).
If you overload the jack during operation, the shear bolt will break. If the shear bolt breaks, as it will at 7,000 lbs. (3175 kg), the load should be supported, but the jack’s handle will drop freely.
Use a jack with a larger load capacity to lower the load safely to the ground. Do not replace the shear bolt with a bolt of greater strength as this could cause the jack to fail and drop the load.
Always use a shear bolt supplied by Hi-Lift Jack Company. Do not replace the shear bolt while the jack is under load.
--
Tony

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July 3, 2010 at 5:52 AM Flag Quote & Reply

dingo
Member
Posts: 14
Wheel nut rattle guns.
Most people struggle to believe me when I say this but the little 12v green gun that every 4x4 shop sells for about $100 is a hammer gun. Big difference, this thing spins a weight when the weights get up enough momentum they hammer the output 1/2 drive. This means it is a 12v flogging spanner requireing the operator to hold down a switch absolutely no effort required. Can it undo an OKA wheel nut? yes and much more, one of the OKA motor homes is currently strandard in my back yard with its rockwell in bits on my bench, Steve stripped it down using my dodgy little green 12v impact gun. The down side with these little marvels is it can take quite some time to finaly loosen very tight nuts ie driveshaft yoke nuts. Wheel nuts are a breese for it, you just need someone to hand you a cuppa while using it! If your keen Kangaroo Imports do bring in a 3/4 drive version, I have never seen it so can't comment but can chase it up if anyone wants. We get all our odds and ends imported from China via these guys, great to deal with.
Tim.
July 6, 2010 at 7:16 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Have looked at them but figure the OKA nuts are tiny enough that anyone can undo them by hand. 5 nuts at 150 ft-lbs and lubricated to boot. Easy.

Now if they bring one out to handle the 20 nuts at 550ft-lbs torque on the MCI rear duals .....
--
Tony

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July 6, 2010 at 7:23 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Cut some holes in the side of the bullbar just near the step as suggested by David. Used a hole saw rather than a square cut out with an angle grinder and the jack fits in nice and snugly.

Tried it out and the big ARB jack copes fairly easily although a light person might have a bit of trouble getting enough weight on the end of the handle.

David suggested putting a bit of 20mm timber between the top of the bullbar and the body, but I was a bit concerned that that could easily result in too much force being applied to what is a fairly light body section. The gap did close up a little but not excessively, so I will be quite happy lifting the front corner using just the strength of the factory bullbar.
--
Tony

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July 11, 2010 at 3:28 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
I just came across this HiLift Jack adaptor for tall vehicles - specifically designed for Fords but the concept may have a place with an Oka here & there. I have a HiLift jack from about 1788 and haven't been taking it, but on a trip last year the other vehicle had one that made a difficult job relatively easy, and we may have been stuffed without it. So I guess now I'm in the market for a 60" one. Ah well, what's a bit more weight.
--
Hal

April 2, 2011 at 5:35 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
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Posts: 510
Has anybody come up with any good ways of storing a HiLift jack on/in their Oka? I'm not keen on 'across the roobar' - although it would get it out of the way.
--
Hal

May 21, 2011 at 4:59 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
Hi Hal,

My camper body is a bit wider than the Oka cabin, and there is enought room to mount my 60" ARB lifter on the step below the fuel tank without it sticking out beyond the body. Keeps the weight of the jack nice and low.

Cheers,
Paul
May 21, 2011 at 5:27 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Hal Harvey at May 21, 2011 at 4:59 PM
Has anybody come up with any good ways of storing a HiLift jack on/in their Oka? I'm not keen on 'across the roobar' - although it would get it out of the way.
Hal,
As one of the "across the roobar" brigade, I couldn't find a better place for it on our Oka. Our alternative was on the rear wheel carrier but we've got enough weight there already.
It would certainly be better lower down and I've seen some mounted under the rear behind the spare but the disadvantage with that and any other low down/underneath arrangements is that in some situations (deep bogging like ours in Blackall, partial rollover, under water), it might be inaccessible just when you need it most.
Ours is almost always accessible, although the weight is a concern, we broke one of the front bullbar bolts on the Anne Beadell and had to carry the jack inside for a couple of days. We put the head inside a milk crate and tied the bar to the bed. Not good.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

May 21, 2011 at 5:58 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
Thanks Paul, I'll go and size that up; might be able to do the same. Any chance you'd have a pic of how it's done? If you have a camper body I'm thinking your profile pic needs an update anyway!
--
Hal

May 21, 2011 at 5:58 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
Hal Harvey at May 21, 2011 at 5:58 PM
Thanks Paul, I'll go and size that up; might be able to do the same. Any chance you'd have a pic of how it's done? If you have a camper body I'm thinking your profile pic needs an update anyway!
Errr well... work in progress. A rapid start (after two years enjoying it just as a truck) when the post about next years CSR trip came up. So far I have the chassis for the camper welded up and lots of drawings, but no walls or roof yet.
I will send you a pic of the jack mounting as far as it has gone, but I better get my act a bit further in gear before I update the profile! The jack is actually a pretty neat fit.
Cheers,
Paul
May 21, 2011 at 6:21 PM Flag Quote & Reply

James & Usha (THEByleDuct)
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Posts: 161
Hi Hal, not an answer to your question but in reference to something Dave Ribbans wrote further up the page. There is a mob around the corner from us who sell air/hydraulic jacks for what seems like a decent price. Might pop around when I have days off next week.
20 000 kgs Air Hydraulic Jack- 2 Return Springs, Min Height: 240mm; Max Height: 495mm; G.W: 19 Kgs $210

--
OKA #072

May 21, 2011 at 6:57 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
Cool idea, but 19kg! That's a bit heavy. These things also have to comply with an Australian Standard to be a vehicle jack - and that probably does - but there's lots of stuff out there that doesn't. HiLifts probably don't either, but I'll keep my 'little' yellow bottle jack too.

David, I missed your reply before. I understand what you say about accessibility - on another vehicle I had it mounted under the tray above the muffler in front of the rear axle - certainly out of the way but I dreaded the day I was knee deep in mud trying to get to it. If I can fit it as Paul describes I'd be happy I think - although above the tank would be even better than below.
--
Hal

May 21, 2011 at 7:12 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Hal,
Hi Lift jacks (and most other vehicle jacks) do have to comply with AS/NZS 2693:2007 Vehicle Jacks as follows. It superseded AS/NZS 2693:2003.
"This Standard is applicable to screw jacks, hydraulic jacks, lever jacks, high lift jacks and pantograph jacks. It is not applicable to trolley jacks, which are specified in AS/NZS 2615, or to air bag jacks".
I haven't read it because it costs $76, but interestingly, many sellers of Hi Lift jacks incorrectly claim compliance with, or certification to, AS/NZS 3693:2003, which is actually a standard for the "Nomenclature of Wheel Chairs".
Might need that one later but for the time being I'll stick with jacks.
AS/NZS 2693 was a voluntary standard but will become mandatory on July 1 2011. See this Product Safety Document and Consumer Protection Notice. Maybe someone can explain what it all means.
The affect on ARB (I had some discussions with them) was that they had to downgrade the claimed capacity of a Hi Lift jack to that of the handle, not the jack itself ie 1050kg rather than 2013kg rating claimed by the manufacture, (who tests them to 3175kg anyway), which is pretty stupid. I doubt that Hi Lift would sell a 2000kg jack with only a 1000kg rated handle.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

May 22, 2011 at 12:57 AM


Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
I bought an air/hydraulic jack not long ago, solely to lift the bigbus up onto blocks. Certainly made that job very easy, but the weight of the jack, and the fairly decent aircompressor you need to run it makes it very impracticable for carrying around in the OKA.

As for hilift jacks - I have the tallest ARB one and it will lift each corner of the OKA (5.5T) without much trouble, but the main upright does bend quite noticeably when it is at full height (lifting the tray under the rope rails) so probably getting to its reasonable limit
--
Tony

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May 22, 2011 at 2:55 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Hal,
Following on from the "across the roobar" concept, it might be pratical to mount the Hi Lift jack lower on the front bullbar around bumper height. The weight would be lower and it would be easier to lift off. In fact I might even try it myself although accessibility might be compromised in a front end bogging.
Of course it would interfere with your fishing boxes, and the colours would clash...



This would put it at pedestrian height though which might make it illegal in some places, and I've heard such mounts described as "damage multipliers".
Also see this Google search for other mounting possibilities.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

May 22, 2011 at 9:52 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
I'd better go start sizing this up. The damage multiplier plan probably won't do it for me - police can frown on such things around here and do have legislation that gives them the power to do something about it too. The common four-tube fishing rod holders on roobars (the cops call them "scone cutters") result in a rash of fines occasionally.

However your photoshopping did remind me of this Pinzgauer I photographed out front of home (Scarborough Beach) in Feb 2010; sure enough, Hi Lift fitted where it fits:






-

This couple also had a simple and effective mounting for the shovel and sandtracks. Bolts on the side with wingnuts for the sandtracks, and one padlock to secure everything; and a shovel simply bolted straight through the handle in two places. But I'm getting off the subject now!

--
Hal

May 22, 2011 at 11:51 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
I am not really sure how to post a picture, but the picture really doesn't tell you much anyway, except to show roughly where I plan to put the jack. There will be a lockable storage box outside the fuel tanks, about 125mm wide, to allow storage for the jack and for oils, grease gun etc. On the other side, 4 MaxTraxes fit into the same space.
How do I add a picture? I am not sure how to get a URL for my pictures - I should know, but......
Cheers,
Paul

May 22, 2011 at 6:02 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
Sent you a PM Paul with the password to the Photobucket account.
Lockable storage boxes hey; not sure that I have much room for that plan. But if I do, I like the idea.
--
Hal

May 22, 2011 at 6:12 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136

The picture doesn't really show much, but this is where the jack will end up. There will be a lockable door on the 'rectangle' forming a box about 125mm wide. This will hold the jack, oils, grease gun etc, with a similar box on the other side holding 4 MaxTraxes.
The doors hinges down with the jack etc to allow access to the fuel filler.



Cheers, Paul

May 22, 2011 at 6:30 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
Tony, re the noticeable bend at full height, you may find this in the HiLift instructions:

"Maximum rated load is 4,660 lbs. (2273 kg) up to 48” (121 cm), tested to 7,000 lbs. (3175 kg). Upper 12” of 60” jack is rated to 2,660 lbs. (1209 kg) only, tested to 4,000 lbs. (1818 kg)."

But I wouldn't worry about it, the day you need every inch to extract yourself, I'll bet you use it.

David, I also have the additional front-end challenge of this cool recovery gear box I made to fit into the receivers when the icebox rack isn't on there... so I think I'm fairly full up on that front. Huh, pun. It carries a truckload of gear... maybe I should just make a smoothed-off full width one that will fit a HiLift... hmmm... could be a bugger to get the jack out of the day I clout a roo with it.



I really like Paul's plan but I may not have the width; and I do have a third battery between the tank and the rear wheel; I'll go measuring.
--
Hal

May 22, 2011 at 7:30 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Hal, I wasn't concerned about the bend because it was obviously well within elastic limits. Just mentioned it in case others might be overly concerned.

If you have the standard bullbar with the jacking points (rectangular holes) just outboard of the two middle uprights, I'd suggest NOT using the one on the passenger side because the operating mechanism will foul the upright and you will have great difficulty in lowering the jack. Cut new jacking points in the side wings and they will make it much easier and safer to use.
--
Tony

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May 22, 2011 at 8:58 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dave and Pauline Gray
Member
Posts: 84
G'day all when mounting a kangaroo jack accessibility is the prime consideration otherwise you may end up in a situation where you need the jack but can't get it out of the vehicle. I speak from experience so my jack is now mounted on the rear 2nd spare carrier. I know all about weight but that was one of the reasons I fitted air bellows and the system has worked well for us over the last two years of travelling in some fairly rough and isolated areas and I'm thankful that the early lesson resulted in remounting the jack in a position where I could access it 100% of the time against 75% so for me its either front rear or roof. Sorry I can't lodge any pics of my mount as everything is off the machine at present but will do so when it all gets reassembled. cheers Dave
May 23, 2011 at 11:14 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
Tony, I see you had already quoted that capacity info on the previous page. Knew I'd read it somewhere!

Dave, that experience sounds like it would be an interesting story - now front, rear or roof is a fair call, but being a bus body with a pop top and fold-down tailgate boot, I'm left with front, or cab roof. I could certainly do the cab roof but it is weight up high; might do it though.

I went and sized up David's suggestion with the old 48", and thought I might have something there for a minute by fitting it to the lid of the gear box and behind the barwork; but there was a little problem with obscuring the lower lights. And it would be a pain in the neck having to lift the jack every time I wanted to get gear out of the box, which would be a lot more frequently than needing the jack.



Nearly but not quite. I thought for a minute there that standing it up behind the driver's seat, using that spot in front of the rear passengers' fridge, could work; and it would with the 48", but not with the 60", and David says I must have a 60". Another nearly but not quite.



Sorry about the lousy photos, only had the phone with me. Now on to Paul's suggestion... looking good here... the third battery was far enough in that all the base gear fitted in alongside it; the extra 12" on the bigger jack will fit in between the rear tyre's front mudflap and the front sliding battery tray; and I could get it a couple of inches higher than shown and still access the fuel filler without modification. Weight down low, between the wheels, accessible - unless Dave can foresee a problem - what do you think?


--
Hal

May 23, 2011 at 9:50 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Aussie Bight Expeditions
Member
Posts: 109
Hal,
With the beach driving you do you would have to put it in one of your boxes or a bag in that position. Mainly due to the sand and salt would destroy the unit and the one time you need it it will be all rusted up. Maybe a nice blue bag, but with the width of your tyres and small mud flaps even that would get destroyed by either a bush / tree or the elements. solve that and it is a very accessible position and about the only place you have left on it anyway.
Happy travelling
ABE Tony
--
May 24, 2011 at 4:58 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
Good point Tony, I was keen on one of these...



... and there is an extra bit goes on the tip for the 60" jack; but a side-opening box like Paul is building would be the better answer in the long run. Or I could just put it on the roof rack behind the spare tyre.
--
Hal

May 24, 2011 at 7:55 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Dave and Pauline Gray
Member
Posts: 84
Hi Hal, I have to confess my jack is a 48" model, and obviously with the height of OKAs the 60" gives you more jack point options, but I have made up a small sling lift for the wheels which allows me to to lift a bogged wheel low down. I also carry a couple of short chains which serve in a multitude of ways, but one of them being to stop the axle/wheel being lifted from sagging to its full extension, which means you are working with the lift being positive at a low height [safer].

The chain goes under the axle and over the chassis, care being taken to position the chain so no wires/brake line etc are trapped or crushed [will probably scratch that blue paint though].

Also my jack is mounted in the standing position on the back. I had a quick look yesterday at standing it on the bullbar adjacent the passenger side vertical bar. It is do-able there but the person in the passenger seat might complain about the view. The roof rack is probably the way i would go with a model like yours [one] you may never need it [two] easy to get down [three] worry about getting it back up there when you have too [make sure the missus is around to help lol].

Regarding my incident I had my jack stored in the back under the beds. Access was from the driver's side only. We were out on the Kidson Track and the road had become a miniature grand canyon that I had driven into with the blind belief it would get better. Anyhow it didn't and after a couple of kms I managed to lean the OKA against the wall of the creek trying to extract myself. All I needed to fix the problem was the jack, but guess which side I was leaning on. Anyhow with a fair amount of bad language I resolved the problem, and reversed up for a couple of kms and headed off in another direction.

Cheers Dave
May 24, 2011 at 10:37 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
For the record, I think we've used our hi lift jack on nearly all of our 5 major outback treks, about 60/40 helping ourselves or other people (mostly broken trailers/caravans).
Dave, we have a hub adaptor (see here, item 3) which fits over the hub and allows the hi lift jack to lift a wheel directly from low down, but your short chain approach is another idea. Maybe a short strap (like a tree trunk protector wound around a few times) might be useable too and a bit less damaging?
Have you got a pic of your wheel sling?
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

May 24, 2011 at 3:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dave and Pauline Gray
Member
Posts: 84
I like the hub lift adapter David. I shall put something like that on my wish list and as you say nothing is that bad when bogged or with a problem of some sort, the only thing you must have is a" worry tree" that is the closest tree with shade and that is where the plan of attack takes place in a cool calmed down way with a liquid appetizer if required. I couldnt find a tree in that damned canyon so I resorted to plan b..... bad language.
cheers Dave
May 24, 2011 at 10:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
I'm figuring on getting one of the things in the pic below too, which incorporates a couple of Dave's ideas above. The front suspension on this Jeep is being pulled together with a ratchet strap, rather than a chain as Dave has used, to force the wheel to lift with the body (good when a wheel has to be worked around/on). Then back at the jack, there's an extra chunk of metalwork on the jack tongue. In this instance it's being used on a rail (it has another one of those pyramid shapes on the other side of the rail), but it can also be attached with a bolt to the appropriate receptacle on the vehicle. More on that when I actually get one I expect. It can also be turned around on the jack tongue and that blue loop hanging down can be used as a sling lift (maybe good for de-bogging), at least on spoked wheels, which I have.



I need to have all this sorted in time for a trip in October, so I'm not sure that a side box will happen in time, and Dave makes some valid points about accessibility in unexpected situations. So I might go with the cab roof rack for the time being at least. The side box for tools etc might happen later on anyway.



--
Hal

May 24, 2011 at 11:15 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
Hi-Lift is organised, just waiting for the plastic box to turn up to put it in. More on that later.

An air bag jack again: what about one of these?
--
Hal

June 10, 2011 at 8:33 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alister McBride
Member
Posts: 97
Hal,
You could make a couple of strong brackets and hang it from the back of the top rail on the bullbar (under your massive iris eradicators!) it would then be above the headlights and easily accessible. I say strong brackets because in a crash you wouldn't want it bouncing up into your face but other than that i think it would work...
Cheers,
Al
June 10, 2011 at 10:28 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul & Sue Crompton
Member
Posts: 44
Hi folks, just a couple of suggestions regarding the hi lift jack and also a suggestion for your shovel. It only takes a few minutes to disassemble and assemble the hi lift jack. The handle itself comes apart with just the removal of one split pin and also the foot base of the jack is the same. Once the foot is off, you can slide the jacking mechanism off the bar. The hi lift bar will then fit behind the number plate along the top of the front bumper bar (not bull bar) with a small modification to the number plate mounting bracket. By welding a couple of bolts on to the top of the bumper bar, you can mount the hi lift bar and screw the nuts down to lock it in place. If you want to drill a couple of holes for the padlocks in the bolts, they would go above the nuts. This allows you to store the foot and the hi lift jack mechanism somewhere low and secure. The handle is reasonably light, so that shouldn't be a big problem.

I have not done this myself but I may look at it next time I go away as I have hub adapters but the weight issue just keeps climbing. I guess if you use the jack constantly, this would be inconvenient but if you only use it occasionally, this may help.

The other thing I thought may be of help is to carry a long handled shovel. I have my shovel mounted at the rear of the front mudflap with a small bracket welded to the mudflap bracket itself and one bolt goes through the shovel (through the steel). The handle then is facing to the rear of the vehicle which slides through an eyelet near the end of the handle so the mudflap can still move forward or backwards and the handle just slides in the eyelet. I haven’t needed to use the shovel but it has been on the vehicle for many hard miles and the handle has only worn a little in the eyelet over the years.



--
Paul & Sue Crompton

June 10, 2011 at 5:09 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
Thanks for that Paul. I've had my two-piece long handled shovel stowed deep inside, not always easy to get to. Another thing to revisit.

I was at a 4WD shop the other day and spotted the hub lifters as referred to in Dandj's post above. The guy there said they were old stock, wouldn't be stocked again, so if anybody wants one and can't find it, and wants to make one themselves, this is what they look like... first pic is upside down, second pic is folded for storage.



[img]http:/http://i1028.photobucket.com/albums/y341/OKA4WD/260/hub_lifter_folded.jpg

I'd be guessing a blue dot sticker is that store's indicator to staff to "sell this for what you can get for it!".
--
Hal

June 12, 2011 at 11:48 AM


Paul & Sue Crompton
Member
Posts: 44
Hal - my hub adapter is completely different. The easiest way to explain it is it looks like an oversized tin with a small hole in the bottom near the edge and it just slides over the hub (snug fit). It is a home made one and basically it is just a heavy tube that is blanked off one end and on that blank there is a small hole to put the jack through. Much heavier in weight than the above but it does spread the load over the whole hub. Cheers.
--
Paul & Sue Crompton

June 12, 2011 at 7:57 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
HiLift jack is now done for #260. The plastic box would have just fitted in down on the RHS like I thought, but I had forgotten about the fold-down end to get the jack out - will be something of an engineering challenge to mount it there successfully. But I was resigned to the roof rack for the time being anyway, and that was easy. The existing crossbars proved to have near-perfect spacing, only took a little rework of one of the mounts supplied with the box, and job's done.



Now I just hope I never have to use it.
--
Hal

July 14, 2011 at 8:17 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hank Onthewater
Member
Posts: 79
Although maybe not a topic directly related to this thread (but is it still recovery), Hal, I noticed on your photo you have 4 bogmats on your roofrack. I have been looking at those as well, but most seem pretty light, and 4-6 tons on them (or divide that by four wheels, is still a fair weight: 1500 kg. Have you or anyone else used them, succesfully?
I have seen (on the net) fibreglass 'Gratemates', and in reality: Bushranger (rubber and heavy), Boab (light plastic) and Maxtrack (orange plastic).
Or, are there any other ones that can be recommended?
Or should I start a separate thread for this?
Hank
--
May fair winds be behind you, sun above, clear waters below, and a safe port ahead. And when in OKA van: replace "clear waters" with "firm ground".

July 15, 2011 at 3:05 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Aussie Bight Expeditions
Member
Posts: 109
Hank
If you go into the forum section I think you will find a section that has discussed this at an earlier stage, as there are alot of topics that have been discussed here at lenght. One just have has to go searching, I think it was either under a topic of sand mats or recovery.
ABE TONY
--
July 15, 2011 at 7:22 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
That would be this one from last month: Sand Mats
--
Hal

July 15, 2011 at 9:45 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
I just pinched this photo from elsewhere - in case anybody ever wonders whether HiLift jacks really do bend if overloaded. Although I don't know that this is actually a real HiLift or a copy.


--
Hal

July 30, 2011 at 8:09 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
"Flexing" they call it.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

July 31, 2011 at 10:17 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
It did the job though. His front wheels are up on top out of the deep rut.

Just need a second jack to get the back ones out.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

August 1, 2011 at 3:34 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
Many years ago I bent a genuine Jackall jack shaft like the one in the picture.
It was straightened by just bending it back the opposite way between the vehicle and a tree and continues to give good service to this day. You can only notice the slight residual remnants of the bend under careful examination.

--
Oka 374 LT Van

August 1, 2011 at 7:03 AM Flag Quote & Reply

OKA in Africa
Member
Posts: 34
Hal Harvey at June 12, 2011 at 11:48 AM
Thanks for that Paul. I've had my two-piece long handled shovel stowed deep inside, not always easy to get to. Another thing to revisit.

I was at a 4WD shop the other day and spotted the hub lifters as referred to in Dandj's post above. The guy there said they were old stock, wouldn't be stocked again, so if anybody wants one and can't find it, and wants to make one themselves, this is what they look like... first pic is upside down, second pic is folded for storage.





I'd be guessing a blue dot sticker is that store's indicator to staff to "sell this for what you can get for it!".
Hello,
This collapsible hub lifter is exactly what I am looking for OKA 327 LT! If anybody knows were I can get one like these please let me know.
Thanks - Grischa OKA 327 LT
December 18, 2011 at 1:39 PM Flag Quote & Reply

joseph baz
Member
Posts: 331
Grischa,try ARB stockist, or TJM,if you can't get it send me a PM and i will send you one
Cheers,Joe
December 19, 2011 at 10:38 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
Grischa, probably no further help but I have come across an original brochure for the folding hub lifter. It now appears on the Documents & Data page. The phone numbers in there indicate it is pre-1988, as at that time they all had an extra digit added.
--
Hal

December 23, 2011 at 3:35 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Moose2367
Member
Posts: 110
In regards to the sand mats above, i have some that are called Sand Trax, made by Dolium, cost me $340 for 4 of them posted to Katherine. Hope the link works
www.dolium.com.au/Retail_Catalogue_page/...t_id=4x4_Accessories



December 23, 2011 at 6:21 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Grischa, I haven't had to use our hub lifters in earnest yet but they work well enough on a trial run.
A couple of points on them if you go that route, or make up something similar:
1) You need a spacer ring to use them on the front hubs, since the front and rear hubs are different diameters. You might also need some small packing pieces to ensure they fit very snugly.
2) After use, mainly on the rear hubs, the ring gets pulled slightly oval by the weight the vehicle and can be difficult to remove. I sometimes have to use a gear puller to lever them off, but if you've got to that point you've probable debogged yourself anyway so it's the least of your worries.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

December 24, 2011 at 9:19 AM Flag Quote & Reply

OKA in Africa
Member
Posts: 34
Thanks for all your input. I will probably get a list together of all the parts I need and then to get them send to my by airfreight. It's a challenge to get parts for the OKA, getting them over to South Africa is even more challenging.
I will send the parts list to the OKA dealers mentioned on the website and request a quote.
Thanks
--
OKA 327 in Africa

photo album



January 14, 2012 at 3:22 PM Flag Quote & Reply

OKA in Africa
Member
Posts: 34

After a three months trip around southern Africa including some recovery activity I think I have found my solution to the Hi Lift Jack question mounting questions.

1) The 150cm jack is now mounted with two bolts on the right side of the OKA, between diesel tank and cabin. The bolts are connecting between the jack bar holes and the cabin floor. A bit of fiddling to slide the jack into this storage location but it is out of the way and protected.

2) After some considerations I did skip the option of getting "hub lifters". I found that the Jacks nose does fit perfectly to the groove of the split rims. I did a test at the front and back wheel. Looks like this is a relativly stable hoisting point. However, trying to lift the front wheel I had to put all my body weight (around 90kgs) at the end of the lever to move the wheel up.



> I was wondering if the rim might be compromised by lifting the vehicle that way.

> Are there any other considerations, e.g. safety wise, structurally, etc.

Please have a look at the high lift jack pictures here:
www.oka4wd.com/apps/photos/album?albumid=13770160
--
OKA 327 in Africa

photo album



August 5, 2012 at 9:48 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Afirca, it looks OK in principle but I wouldn't recommend it except in a dire emergency.
All the weight is on the nose of the jack (it's weakest point) and if the wheel has some rotational tension on it (ie in gear), or if the vehicle is on a slight slope, when you lift the wheel it could spin or move and cause an accident or damage.
i'm not familiar with split rims but could it cause the rim to disengage?
A lifting strap around the hub would be safer or you could make cut outs in the bullbar for the jack nose.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

August 6, 2012 at 10:37 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
I also thought it would be very limiting if the vehicle was on any sort of a sideways slope - the jack really has to be parallel to the side of the vehicle, and that isn't always going to work. Hub lifters may not be much better of course. Other jacking points would make sense.



Would be interested to see the jack mounting position when you can do a photo.
--
Hal

August 6, 2012 at 11:53 AM Flag Quote & Reply

OKA in Africa
Member
Posts: 34
The bulge of the rim is actually sitting on the horizontal part of the jack "nose". The nose is interlocking a bit with the split rim groove so it cannot easily slip off. The split ring of the rim is located on the outer circumference of the rim, it wouldn't come off.


There are two more points helping with a bit of stability I guess. The one point is that the vertical part of the jack is supported against the rear tray (or front door) and cannot move towards that direction. The other point is that the lifted weight of the vehicle is on the axle, therefore the weight "hanging" below the jack nose.


However I am still concerned about the stability and think I have to find out in practice but always be aware that the jack might come off at any time. I guess Hi lift jacks are just dangerous tools and have to be operated with utmost care.


Regarding the mounting position of the jack I have no detail picture but have added a picture to the album ( www.oka4wd.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=162094462 ).
--
OKA 327 in Africa

photo album



August 6, 2012 at 4:15 PM

David and Janet Ribbans - Oka 148
Oka148 profile here.
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