Tyre monitors

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02 Nov 2012 22:01 #1 by dandjcr
dandjcr created the topic: Tyre monitors
Forum Home > On the Road > Tyre monitors

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
I have read a few of you have tyre monitors. I have tube tyres, 255.100.16, would they be worth getting.
I am thinking that the pressure would be fine but would I get an accurate temperature reading with a tube tyre.

Ewart
June 14, 2010 at 3:29 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
I think a TPMS (Tyre Pressure Monitoring System) is worth getting, but the one I have won't work with tubes. I'll do a bit of internet research in a minute, but I think what you need is one where the sender units screw on like valve caps; and apart from being susceptible to damage, they surely can't report tyre temperature accurately.

The one I got was from www.zartronix.com , who used to be just up the road but has since moved to Victoria; it reads the four tyres in succession, about 15 seconds each, and can be set up to include spare, trailer, whatever, up to 12 tyres I think; and in the latest version has a second default pressure range, which means you can set it so that it doesn't go berserk when you drop the tyres to sand pressure.



However a lot of people with all sorts of brands of TPMS report communication failures, and my unit was no exception. It worked fine for a while, then would lose communication with one sender after another after about 15 minutes of operation. Funny thing was I could pull the plug on it, plug it back in straight away, and it would start afresh again, working. After reading elsewhere that others had similar problems with other brands, I thought there must be a particular reason for it, and rang Zar (he is contactable) to find out if there was an easy fix. He was more than co-operative, offering a free software upgrade (well out of warranty time - this is after a couple of years) - so I now have the dual-range pressure option too - and also provided an aerial extension in case the big metal box (Oka) was making reception difficult. I've just put it back in today, yet to test it.



You can set the 'usual' pressure and temperature ranges for your own scenarios as you need. This is where I mounted mine - it's sort of hard-wired in - I fed the plug wire through a hole alongside the handbrake boot and wired it in to power and earth behind the dash, rather than using the lighter plug. The connection to the display is pulled off the headset in the pic; it plugs into the lower RH corner.


Almost forgot, all of these things are made in Asia of course, but Zar has just written his own Australian-language instruction manual for this, and also supplied me that when he sent the headset back too. When I got this originally (coupla years ago) the manual was virtually pointless - it was incomprehensible. I would expect other brands to be the same. But the new manual I was using today - no problem. I can email it to any members if you want a comprehensive understanding of what this can do.
--
Hal

June 14, 2010 at 8:25 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
So for tubed tyres you need an external sender that screws on to the valve; and I soon found some intelligent comment from Peter @ Aawen4x4:

I've used a few different types, and while the 'attach to the valve' units are quite handy, they tend to suffer a little from the terrain you are driving on, and can be damaged. In addition, the temps that they report are biased a little by the ambient temps and conditions like rain etc. Driving in rain reports significantly lower temps from the valve mounted jobbies than the temps reported by the internally mounted units - I know cos more than once I've run both! And when I use a totally separate temp probe on the tyre, the internal unit is much closer than the one that's exposed to the elements. The only issues I have had with the internal units is 1. that you need to be a little careful when changing or repairing tyres (never had an issue tho) and 2. now after more than six years, two of the sender units have cracked their mountings - still working fine, and they've done about 700,000kms, so I can't be all that upset, but it means I'm gonna hafta get them sorted!
So while the internal units might have a few niggles like those above and the battery changing (BTW, mine are about six years old and I haven't need to change a battery yet!) they give a much better picture of what's going on with the tyre. Of course, you can't use them with internal bead locks either, but then I've never felt the need to fit internal bead locks, cos the TPMS reports INSTANTLY you start losing pressure, and flashes a warning if it is sudden or goes lower than your set limit. Haven't 'killed' a tyre since I put them in there! And they give you so much more information!

He goes on to make the pertinent observation that although the screw-on TPMS senders may not report temperature accurately, it's all relative; you really just want to know when they're disproportionately higher than normal.

A couple of other thoughts: I went with the Zartronix unit because I can see at a glance if what it's reporting is in the green, not the red - both pressure and temp - i.e. I don't have to put on my glasses to see what's going on! Most/all other displays are monochrome.

And this from another post I did last year: another benefit is that - and I'll bet you never thought of this - while you're pumping your tyres back up and it's raining/windy/mosquito-ridden/fifty degrees outside, you can sit inside drinking coffee or savouring the air conditioning... Just glance at the monitor every once in a while to see when the tyre's up to pressure; then jump out to change the hose on to the next tyre, and back in with barely a pause of the DVD. There have been times when that has been much better than doing it like the unwashed have to.
--
Hal

June 14, 2010 at 9:24 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
Thanks for that Hal, I guess that if the pressure was on the rise it would indercate the heat was also on the rise.

Ewart
June 14, 2010 at 9:26 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
Seeing I'm just about to spend a heap of money on new tyres:P I've ordered a zartronix system as well.
Bringing the OKA back from WA, pulled in to have a cup of coffee and found one rear tyre down to about 20psi. No harm done luckily and turned out to be a leak around the valve stem. Good luck that time but if we hadn't stopped, the tyre would likely have been a write off a few miles further on.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

June 24, 2010 at 4:03 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
Fitted the monitors yesterday and just fired the system up thismorning.

I first set the tyre pressures using a normal dial gauge. Accuracy unknown but the size of the scale means I can set two tires up to the same pressure within say 0.2psi. Several repeats and "blipping" the pressure showed tyres across the axle exactly the same pressure.

Monitor fails big-time for accuracy showing more than 2.5psi difference across the front axle and 1.5psi across the back axle. 2.5psi error in a reading of 50psi is a lot.

I'll check absolute accuracy as best I can by using at least 5 other guages I have - dial, electronic and pencil - but it isn't absolute accuracy I have an issue with, its consistency between tryres..

5% reading error is not what I would expect from state of the art pressure transducers. Different if they were $10 each but $55 should buy something better.


Just as an aside. When the old tyres were dismounted, it became obvious why I have had two tyres leak around the valve stem. The holes in the rims are a little undersized (I had to drill them out to get the standard valve stem seals supplied with the monitors to fit properly) and the sealing rubbers on the inside were not seated properly and all distorted. Wonder is they sealed at all.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

July 16, 2010 at 8:41 AM Flag Quote & Reply

okadoc
Member
Posts: 98
Hi folks, we perchased the Davies Craig TPMS system and its saved us at least 2 tyres from memory and would not travel without them, to be honest we dont moniter the temp as the pressure drop happens in front of the temp and renders a wait for the temperature to rise insane if you know what i mean. Informative reading daviescraig.com.au have a captain cook at the video on electric variable speed water pumps and fans controlled by a digital controller, hmmmmm
--
July 16, 2010 at 5:03 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
Hal reported

"However a lot of people with all sorts of brands of TPMS report communication failures, and my unit was no exception. It worked fine for a while, then would lose communication with one sender after another after about 15 minutes of operation. Funny thing was I could pull the plug on it, plug it back in straight away, and it would start afresh again, working. After reading elsewhere that others had similar problems with other brands, I thought there must be a particular reason for it, and rang Zar (he is contactable) to find out if there was an easy fix. He was more than co-operative, offering a free software upgrade (well out of warranty time - this is after a couple of years) - so I now have the dual-range pressure option too - and also provided an aerial extension in case the big metal box (Oka) was making reception difficult. I've just put it back in today, yet to test it."

and I missed the last four words and assumed that Hal's unit with modifications did perform as required. Any update Hal and if you did get it working perfectly, where did you locate the external antenna.

reason I'm asking is I've just about had enough. Received it back yesterday after (supposedly) the factory in Taiwan made major changes to the firmware - which proved to be ineffectual when tested and then made some more changes. They then tested my unit for 1200km whatever that means and sent it back to me. Forget how long ago I paid my money but ...

Unit is acting up exactly the same way as before despite some changes to the way the thing operates. My antenna is hanging as close ass possible to midway between all the wheels (except the spare which I deleted from the sequence ages ago) and it is hanging well below thew chassis and body. Still fails to reliably pick up all wheels all the time and still occasionally shows two successive wheels with the same pressure even though they aare quite different. ONLY change for the better is that it now realises it is not getting a valid signal within a minute instead of holding on to the last value received for up to 30 minutes.

Appreciate your input Hal - because I have wasted far too much time and money and wandered on to the wrong side of the road once too often trying to see what it is doing.

I would like to have it but it must be reliable and it must work.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

October 7, 2010 at 4:42 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter_n_Margaret
Member
Posts: 198
I suspect that all steel Michelin tyres will make it very hard to transmit a signal compared with a rag walled tyre.

Cheers,
Peter
--
Cheers Peter, OKA196 Motorhome. www.oka4wd.com/xt196.htm



October 7, 2010 at 8:18 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
Peter_n_Margaret at October 7, 2010 at 8:18 PM
I suspect that all steel Michelin tyres will make it very hard to transmit a signal compared with a rag walled tyre.

Cheers,
Peter
Hadn't thought of that, but would hope the designers did.

Did find a spot for the antenna that allows the unit to work most of the time but there are still bugs in the software that occasionally show a pressure as being the same as that of the previous wheel, but with different temperatures.
Probably as good as I'm going to get, but may need to make a little hood to go over it so I'm not looking at it all the time to see when and how it fails.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

October 7, 2010 at 8:49 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Rodman
Member
Posts: 40
Over here in the States I have the Central Tire Inflation System in my Deuce 4x4. I will post link explaning the system. Its very good.
auto.howstuffworks.com/self-inflating-tire2.htm


The idea behind the CTIS is to provide control over the air pressure in each tire as a way to improve performance on different surfaces. For example, lowering the air pressure in a tire creates a larger area of contact between the tire and the ground and makes driving on softer ground much easier. It also does less damage to the surface. This is important on work sites and in agricultural fields. By giving the driver direct control over the air pressure in each tire, maneuverability is greatly improved.

Another function of the CTIS is to maintain pressure in the tires if there is a slow leak or puncture. In this case, the system controls inflation automatically based on the selected pressure the driver has set.
There are two main manufacturers of the CTIS: U.S.-based Dana Corporation and France-based Syegon (a division of GIAT). Dana Corporation has two versions, the CTIS for military use (developed by PSI) and the Tire Pressure Control System (TPCS) for commercial, heavy machinery use.
CTIS: Inside
Here is a look at the overall system:
A wheel valve is located at each wheel end. For dual wheels, the valves are typically connected only to the outer wheel so the pressure between the two tires can be balanced. Part of the wheel valve's job is to isolate the tire from the system when it's not in use in order to let the pressure off of the seal and extend its life. The wheel valve also enables on-demand inflation and deflation of the tires.
An electronic control unit (ECU) mounted behind the passenger seat is the brain of the system. It processes driver commands, monitors all signals throughout the system and tells the system to check tire pressures every 10 minutes to make sure the selected pressure is being maintained. The ECU sends commands to the pneumatic control unit, which directly controls the wheel valves and air system. The pneumatic control unit also contains a sensor that transmits tire-pressure readings to the ECU.
An operator control panel allows the driver to select tire-pressure modes to match current conditions. This dash-mounted panel displays current tire pressures, selected modes and system status. When the driver selects a tire-pressure setting, signals from the control panel travel to the electronic control unit to the pneumatic control unit to the wheel valves.
When vehicles are moving faster (like on a highway), tire pressure should be higher to prevent tire damage. The CTIS includes a speed sensor that sends vehicle speed information to the electronic control unit. If the vehicle continues moving at a higher speed for a set period of time, the system automatically inflates the tires to an appropriate pressure for that speed.
This type of system uses air from the same compressor that supplies air to the brakes. A pressure switch makes sure the brake system gets priority, preventing the CTIS from taking air from the supply tank until the brake system is fully charged.
Hummer self-inflating tire system: At the wheel A Closer Look
Here is what happens on the road: The electronic control unit tells the pneumatic control unit to check current pressure and either inflate or deflate the tire to the pressure selected by the driver. If the system determines that inflation is needed, it first checks to make sure that brake pressure reserves are where they should be; if they are, it applies a slight pressure to the wheel valve to allow inflation. If the tires are overinflated, the system applies a slight vacuum to the wheel valve. When the pneumatic control unit reads that the appropriate pressure is reached, the valve closes.
In this illustration, you can see the pathway that the air travels for inflation or deflation once it gets to the wheel. The tubing runs from the vehicle's air compressor through the wheel hub and then to the tire valve. The "quick disconnect fitting" allows the tire to be separated from the CTIS system for removal or servicing. (This diagram also shows the Hummer's run-flat feature, which allows the tire to continue supporting the vehicle even when it will not hold any air.)
April 20, 2011 at 10:52 AM Flag Quote & Reply

okadoc
Member
Posts: 98
Enjoyable easter to all happy campers, I can comment only this on TPMS. Since we started using the tyregaurd from Davies Craig we have not experienced any further premature tyre destruction , you can see the display if you want to but the low altitude terrain contact immenient warning lifts you out of your white line slumber and reality returns with a much faster heartbeat . With the roads less travelled that we spend our time on and the broad spectrum of conditions experienced all year round to eliminate the tyre failures is testamount to a system thats proving itself everyday to be have the best pay back time on investment over and over again.
Cheers to all, Doc and Lyn
April 20, 2011 at 1:52 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
When someone comes out with a unit with internal sensors that will work with steel radials on solid steel wheels, let me know.
Can't see that external sensors would be worth the trouble, especially if there is a need to change the pressures too often.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

April 20, 2011 at 6:37 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
I asked John Marano at All Terrain Warriors what they use, figuring they were the middle man between a product manufacturer and customers who would complain if bits on their new truck didn't work. His response was:

"We sell an S&T TPMS here at work but there are plenty available..... you just have to make sure the one you get will cover you at the pressures you run to. Ours is a commercial grade unit for the trucking industry....same with most of our products......not the sort of stuff you buy at ARB, etc....Many conventional 4bie units only run to 65psi or thereabouts. We also fit a really cool nav unit with a built in TPMS but ...same deal ...only goes to 65psi and most of our trucks run between 65 and 95psi."

The S&T is external (screw on to the valve stem) sensors, some details here. It doesn't say it there but I believe there's a temperature alarm if the tyre temp exceeds 75 degrees too.


--
Hal

April 20, 2011 at 9:18 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
How about buying one Hal and letting us know how it goes.:D
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

April 21, 2011 at 11:20 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
Trouble is they don't come in a polished anodised blue colour, like the valve caps I just bought...
--
Hal

April 22, 2011 at 6:03 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 413
The problem with the external screw on the stem type sensors is that they cannot give a true indication of temp as they are cooled by airflow or heated by the sun if stationary, subject to destruction if fitted to rubber stems and driven on corrugations, subject to destruction when the vehicle is used on tracks owing to the Oka having a slightly wider track the wheels are running on the outside edges and the scrub is that much closer. We've travelled with friends that have had various brands and sensor types and apart from the internal sensors were never a success. Even the internal butterfly type sensors broke off when the tyres were run at low pressures in sand, not sure to being physically hit by the flattened tyre or vibration. The only sensors that survived were the internal strap on type. We've never had TPMS as the Humvee had CTIS which is a really great benefit when touring on varying road surfaces as pressures can be adjusted to suit on the go, tyres with slow leaks can be kept inflated till repaired and best of all the vehicle can be levelled so the rooftop tent is level.
--
Oka 374 LT Van

April 22, 2011 at 7:31 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
This gaget might overcome one objection to external sensors used in off-road situations


www.tpms.ca/TPMSVALVEPurchase.php
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

April 25, 2011 at 12:21 AM

David and Janet Ribbans - Oka 148
Oka148 profile here.
Visit our technical and travel blogs: here.

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07 Jan 2013 22:04 - 07 Jan 2013 22:05 #2 by OKA in Africa
OKA in Africa replied the topic: Tyre monitors
I have bought a tyre pressure monitor for the OKA and cannot recommend it. It is a TireMoni tm-201.

I have tested the system on the OKA and Landcruiser an the problems I had/have:

1. It takes a long time (sometimes a couple of minutes) to get a data connection to the sensors and a reading on the display
2. Batteries in the senders need to be changed often
3. Set up of the unit is not user friendly



Thank you and best regards

OKA #327 in Africa
www.oka4wd.com/forum/members-vehicles-pu...47-oka-327-in-africa
Attachments:
Last Edit: 07 Jan 2013 22:05 by OKA in Africa.

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08 Jan 2013 05:41 #3 by Outback Jack
Outback Jack replied the topic: Tyre monitors
So the hunt for a good tyre monitor continues.......

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08 Jan 2013 06:26 #4 by Peter and Sandra OKA 374
Peter and Sandra OKA 374 replied the topic: Tyre monitors
We've got the Sensatyre brand on 374, they work very well and so far have alerted us to two slow leaks, one due to staking and one to a nail, which in both cases meant stopping, plugging the hole and continuing on after reinflation, two tyres saved so the unit has paid for itself. We do have the remote antenna under the truck cable tied to the rear tailshaft safety loop, it picks up the spare mounted on the rear tyre carrier ok as well. Usually by the time I've started the engine, put my seatbelt on a dn driven off it has picked up all five tyres. The sensors are the internal ones mounted to the rim by a big utilux type hose clamp. Have been in situ for two years with no problems so far. I don't know how they would go with the much thicker steel wheels though.

OKA 374 LT Van, converted to camper/motorhome,
400ah Lithiums, 680w solar, diesel cooking heating and HWS,
Cummins 6BT, Allison 6 speed auto, Nissan transfer.

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09 Jan 2013 07:37 - 09 Jan 2013 09:29 #5 by Peter Davis
Peter Davis replied the topic: Tyre monitors
Hi all, We have the Tyre Guard 400 by Davies Craig.

It worked fine, didn't need relay and survived a trip around Australia including roads like Gibb River and Great Central. Apparently can get CMCA discount which i didn't realize at the time. It saved us on three occassions so more than paid for itself. Fairly easy to use and set up. It did occassionally play up that it couldn't pick up a sensor which usually came good or wriggled the battery sensor. If buying one , purchase a new version as the old one has a fault in that it supplies power back to the vehicle when the ignition is turned off. I discovered this when I heard the intercooler water pump kept running when the vehicle was turned off. I also bought extra sensors for the spare tyres.
Last Edit: 09 Jan 2013 09:29 by Hal Harvey.

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09 Jan 2013 08:17 #6 by Dave and Pauline Gray
Dave and Pauline Gray replied the topic: Tyre monitors
Hi all we also purchased the Tyre Guard system which is similar to OIA Tyre Moni unit and have no problems with its readouts and reliability but when venturing off into the wilderness we found it a bit of a pita removing and replacing the sensors for adjusting the tyre pressures so I purchased a set of T piece tyre valves as per Tony Lees photo and whilst fitting the first one to a rim managed to shear off the T part with little pressure on the fitting and on inspection found this was just a soldered fitting which is totally unsuitable for travelling in the bush as a whack with a stick or rock etc would pretty well garantee failure and replacement off a valve at the least.

Cheers Dave

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09 Jan 2013 17:56 #7 by Paul and Sue Crompton
Paul and Sue Crompton replied the topic: Tyre monitors
Hi folks, I am just about to purchase a TPMS as we all know the 16" tyres for Okas are truly over the top cost wise and availability can be a problem as well. So the system I am looking at at this stage is the basic tyredog (the type that screws on the outside of the valve). I do not want to buy this on line as I want to make sure that parts are readily available. The seller is quite happy to fit the system to make sure it works on the Oka so I guess I can't ask for more. If anybody has owned and used this particular product and had any issues, good or bad, would you please let me know as I plan to get one in the next week or two. Bye for now. Thanks Paul.

Paul Crompton - OKA 168

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09 Jan 2013 19:07 #8 by Ewart and Vivian Halford
Ewart and Vivian Halford replied the topic: Tyre monitors
Paul my cousin and I had a set each when we did the CSR, he had no problem but one of my sensors gave a faulty reading (lower pressure reading than was in the tire) the other three were faily accurate, the faulty one stayed constant so you could see if there was any change but it would set off the alarm, not that I could hear that in the oka. We both had a large fluctuation in the temperaturere reading so not to sure how good that was, at least if it got excessive we would have checked.
So yes I was a bit disappointed but they did let me know how the tires were going, but you had to be watching as I said before I could not hear the alarm. We had no tire problems so they never proved them selves but I was happy with no tire troubles.
Hope this was of some help.

Ewart oka 365
0428911147

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10 Jan 2013 04:27 #9 by steven.beale
steven.beale replied the topic: Tyre monitors
Hi all i have the Sensatyre kit on 107 work very will pick's up all nine tyres
if any one would like a sensatyre kit i know the importer very well and think he would be to pleased
to do a good deal for the oka boys.

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10 Jan 2013 05:54 #10 by Peter_n_Margaret
Peter_n_Margaret replied the topic: Tyre monitors
Question for your mate Steven....
Will the strap on version work with all steel tyres?

Cheers, Peter.
OKA196 tinyurl.com/OKA196xtMotorhome
Mob.0428171214

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10 Jan 2013 07:59 #11 by Dave and Pauline Gray
Dave and Pauline Gray replied the topic: Tyre monitors
Peter when James and Usher purchased their OKA ILEAN it had 285x19.5 Toyos fitted with the Sensdyne system he may be able to give you some information when the cyclone has passed their area.

Cheers Dave

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10 Jan 2013 10:27 #12 by Frank
Frank replied the topic: Tyre monitors
Steven,
If it is the version 2 of SensaTyre and the answer to Peter's question is 'yes' then I am interested in a set.
Let us know the cost.
thanks
frank

Frank & Christine Thomas

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10 Jan 2013 14:16 #13 by Hal Harvey
Hal Harvey replied the topic: Tyre monitors
I'd be interested too, eight strap-on sensors required.

I do note on a website or two that max pressure for the SensaTyre is 60psi - fine for those of us with LT tyres - maybe not fine for everybody.

I'd also be interested in knowing how user-friendly it is to change pressure alarm ranges - i.e. If it's a PITA every time you drop your tyre pressures. That was one of the theoretically good things about the Zartronix system was that it supported multiple alarm ranges. Unfortunately the rest of it let it down.

Principal advisor to the Minister for Tourism, Liza Harvey MLA
... OKA 260 ... "I'm not leaving any sooner than I have to!"
www.byles.net/OLDportal/members-vehicles-public/5-oka-260

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10 Jan 2013 14:43 #14 by Frank
Frank replied the topic: Tyre monitors
Hal,
I'm told that the version 2 has a max of 80PSI and 14 tyres.

Steven, can you check this?

Frank & Christine Thomas

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11 Jan 2013 11:07 #15 by steven.beale
steven.beale replied the topic: Tyre monitors
Afternoon all, sorry for the late reply
was just talking to my mate peter spowart from Hannibal Safari Equipment, (he is the importer of the SensaTyre).
He said he would be more then happy to look after the oka group.
if you send him an email or give him a ring he will give you all the info you need
just tell hime that you are in the oka owner group and you were talking to myself steven beale and you will get a great price.

Peter Spowart
Hannibal Safari Equipment
9/25 Ingleston Road
TINGALPA QLD 4173
AUSTRALIA
(P) 61 7 3348 9388
(F) 61 7 3348 9377
(M) 0408 887 442
(e) This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
(w) www.hannibalsafari.com.au

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21 Jan 2013 12:06 #16 by Frank
Frank replied the topic: Tyre monitors
has anyone tried these with the Michelin XML 325 85 16 Tyres yet?

Frank & Christine Thomas

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21 Jan 2013 12:16 #17 by Peter_n_Margaret
Peter_n_Margaret replied the topic: Tyre monitors
Or with Michelin XDE2 305R70/19.5, ALL steel.

Cheers, Peter.
OKA196 tinyurl.com/OKA196xtMotorhome
Mob.0428171214

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21 Jan 2013 18:17 - 21 Jan 2013 18:19 #18 by steven.beale
steven.beale replied the topic: Tyre monitors
I have them on 107 which is running Michelin XML 325 85 16
Last Edit: 21 Jan 2013 18:19 by steven.beale.

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