Camper body

More
01 Nov 2012 13:58 #1 by dandjcr
dandjcr created the topic: Camper body
Forum Home > On the Road > Camper body
1 2 3 4 Next »

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
Hi all. There are a few of us building or planning to build a camper body. I am in the planning stage.
I would like to make contact with those of you that have built or are building to get some of your ideas and innovative solutions. We all have different needs but it is good to get a wide range of options. Are there things you would not do again.
Peter & Margaret, what did you make your chassis with and how did you attach it to the OKA chassis?
There are a few slideouts I have seen and would be keen to talk to those of you who have done this.
My email is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Ewart
OKA365
--
March 11, 2011 at 5:59 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Cando
Member
Posts: 199
Hi Ewart
As you can see from our pics we are rebuilding 112. Once the rebuild is complete we will be looking to build a 'camper ' type back. We are looking at the option of using a slide on type, this way its ready in minutes and we can still utilise the tray. The back will probably have legs that fall down to take the load when you drive away or a hydraulic set up run off the PTO. I've looked at different types but not sure quite how to do it yet. I'm keen to use alloy for the internals as much as practicable, not sure about the main frame though.
cheers
--
Happy trails

Cando and Bron XLT 112



March 11, 2011 at 7:34 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
We're right in the middle of converting 374's van body into a poptop camper like John & Laura's Szkoruda's 147, with a rear slideout north south bed like Sue & Keith Harris' 191. Both couples have my deepest gratitude for the help and assistance they have given as well as allowing us to view their campers before we started. The slideout is built, the hole in the roof is done and the actual poptop roof is being skinned at the moment.
--
Oka 374 LT Van

March 11, 2011 at 7:56 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Cando
Member
Posts: 199
Peter, Do you have any pics? would be good to see how it all works.
cheers
--
Happy trails

Cando and Bron XLT 112



March 11, 2011 at 8:06 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
I have some of the construction so far, nothing assembled as yet as it all has to stay out until the poptop is fitted due to needing clear access to the interior to fit the poptop. Once the poptop is fitted then the rest can go in and I can complete the interior fitout.
Hopefully should start fitting the poptop next week. Sandra is away with the camera at the moment so will have to wait till she returns to post pics.
Peter
--
Oka 374 LT Van

March 11, 2011 at 9:03 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
Cando, I too like the slideon idea but the extra weight worries me.
Peter, I have always been keen on a slideout but the moving parts and dust ingress is a concern.
Thanks for your response, keep it coming.
Ewart
March 11, 2011 at 10:23 PM Flag Quote & Reply

James & Usha (THEByleDuct)
Administrator
Posts: 161
I'm still in the design stages but am planning to use monopan throughout. I'm working on gull wings either side with inner fold downs which will house a double mattress. The sides will be Avan-esque, folding up from on top of the mattress base which will allow a completely enclosed bed area which won't encroach too much on the inside and avoids using canvas.

James
--
OKA #072

March 12, 2011 at 12:15 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
#023 in Queensland has a pretty good slide-on behind the dual cab - I've only seen the photo but the owner seemed happy with it.

March 12, 2011 at 1:06 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
Ewart
Keith and Sue's has been working ok for quite a few years now with no problems, has no water or dust leaks. It closes firmly against normal door type seals and is secured with over centre catches to stop it moving. Their is virtually no play in the roller system. Keith has adapted a awning blind which rolls out with the slideout keeping most of the weather off when it is out and I'm going to do the same.
I've made ours very similar and the two of us can pick it up off the floor with no problems, that is just the slideout without bedding.
There is a picture of theirs in amongst the Gatton photo's.
--
Oka 374 LT Van

March 12, 2011 at 7:07 AM Flag Quote & Reply

David Hallandal
Member
Posts: 133
I have built the Camper Body on the back of mine, Electric Pop top, Lift up Gulll Wing Side Doors.... and a Camper Trailer with Gull Wing Doors and Drop down beds. I am very happy with both designs.
Materials for your project is very important place to start
I am happy to speak to any OKA Owner on these projects including Materials and Designs. Phone me to have talk about your options (Send a Personal Message for my Phone Number)
March 12, 2011 at 10:03 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
I've just uploaded pics into a new album in the photo gallery of the conversion so far.
Title 374
--
Oka 374 LT Van

March 12, 2011 at 10:37 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
David, how do I contact you. I can't find a phone number or email address for you.
Ewart
March 12, 2011 at 11:05 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
Ewart if you click on his name in blue underneath the little picture of his oka it will give you a screen to click on another "send a message " link to contact him.
Peter
--
Oka 374 LT Van

March 12, 2011 at 1:44 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
ok thanks peter
March 12, 2011 at 2:40 PM Flag Quote & Reply

John & Laura Szkoruda
Member
Posts: 111
Gee I like 023 ' s set up looks neat. Peter & Sandra that roof gutter & rib cage for the pop top look very familiar, looking good so far glad you could understand the drawings, dont know how Rick W is going with his. Ewart have answered you email, but if you can weld, have some mechanical ability and have lots of patience & not scared to cut BIG holes in your bus it isn't really that hard ( says us who have finished).. and the slide out looks good too. Look forward to seeing the finished bus.

--
John & Laura Szkoruda OKA 147

March 12, 2011 at 7:41 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
Does any one know who owns Tardis, it is a neat finish.
March 12, 2011 at 8:20 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Ewart, we built a raised roof on our Oka and fitted out the inside as a 2 person motorhome. See our blog here or our Home Page (148 ) for overall specs.
I have tons more photos of the internal fitout available if you'd like more details.


--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

March 12, 2011 at 11:57 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
Thank David. There doesn't seem to be much you haven't got. Yes there is a lot to consider and I am at the first stage of planning. My first decision is the construction of the base frame.
I like your water heater, I would like to go that way myself. I am also keen on using an Autofridge.
Can you leave the bed made up or does it automatically form a couch when it is in travel mode, similar to a caravan design I saw a few years back.
I hope to get to the Caravan and Camping show on Saturday in Perth to get some ideas.
I am sure I will be in contact with you in the future.
Ewart
March 13, 2011 at 12:03 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Ewart, re the body style, we liked Peter and Margaret Wright's concept (#196) but I didn't want to build a new rear body, I didn't have the skills or time back then.

Theirs is wider and longer than ours so they have a bit more space inside than we have but it was easier for us to just fit out the existing bus body. We wanted the ability to stand up without having to raise a pop-top roof but that's a personal preference.

The slideout slat bed works fine but we do have to manually move one of the mattress halves to form the seat back during the day. The bed roll goes behind the seat to provide a sloping back. We could leave the bed down but it makes the kitchen area a bit squeezy. Essentials are still accessible though (shower, fridge, cooktop, sink, pantry etc). There are mechanical hinge/spring fixings available (also called futon hinges) to automate the sea/bed arrangement (eg www.marcleleisure.co.uk/store/rr01.php ) but they took up more space than we had available. Slats take up no space when stowed. There are a few other bed construction pics here.

Slat bed partially extended. I used 16mm Tasmanian oak for the slats, 10mm plywood wasn't strong enough. Plastic strips on the aluminium frame allows the slats to slide easily.

Regards,
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

March 14, 2011 at 1:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
Thanks for the photos David & Janet.
Peter & Margaret's is a nice set up but a bit big for me though Peter will tell you he never turns back.
Ewart
March 14, 2011 at 7:03 PM


Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Ewart, I've posted a lot more internal construction photos here.
We'd all like more space of course, but were surprised and pleased how effectively everything turned out.
We've had very few failures with the internal fit-out after nearly 100k km of outback travels (fridge door hinge broke on the CSR, cupboard door latches needed strengthening, LED light failures on Cape York, shower base outlet pipes fractured, roof fan mounting shattered on the Anne Beadell highway).
And we've made very few fit-out alterations (moved the noisy water pump to under the floor, added a second pump, added a 50L internal flexible water tank to increase capacity to 150L (plus 40L in the hot water tank), added a lot of electronics (but I am an electronics engineer so that's not surprising)).
The only other things we'd really like are nice comfy easy chairs for the evenings, if we only had the space...
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

March 15, 2011 at 7:54 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
You have done alot of work. there is plenty of storage space.
Watching the sun going down in an easy chair, Thats my idea of relaxation.
Ewart
March 15, 2011 at 10:32 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Mick
Member
Posts: 9
Hi Folks
Seeing all these Oka Campers makes me jealous (and envious) !!
Not owning an Oka myself at the moment, makes me think of all the great places I'll be able to go if and when I get my Volvo Camper project up and running.
I was wondering if anyone had made (or bought) a slide on Camper that was self contained (bed & kitchen), but had a side door access that when pushed opened, had a shower / toilet recess that was still attached to the camper (like a slide out bed, but shower / toilet recess instead)?
Also, can anyone please tell me the size that the short & long bus bodies come in ?
Cheers - Mick
March 15, 2011 at 7:30 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Cando
Member
Posts: 199
Hi Mick,
I've tried to upload the specs for the body sizes without luck? if you send me an email I'll be able to attach
--
Happy trails

Cando and Bron XLT 112



March 15, 2011 at 7:50 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
See here... pretty much 3350 or 3650, roughly.
--
Hal

March 15, 2011 at 10:41 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
For info, I've posted Oka body dimensions and layouts here.
BTW, the shorter bus body (smaller rear side window, pic 1) doesn't seem to be an XT/LT thing, ours is an XT but with the full length bus body. I suspect the shorter bus body was either on very early models only, or was not a 13 seat bus configuration (pic 2). But I could be wrong....
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

March 15, 2011 at 11:32 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
Hi all,
Last year I drove to Queensland to meet a chap who offered wonderful facilities for producing CNC machined composite panels. He showed me what he could do, and it was very impressive the amount and complexity of machining that he could do at a very reasonable price. The panels were to be fully structural, but still weigh only 5kg per square metre.

So I designed a very complex arrangement with slide out bed, slide out and down bathroom, electrically raised roof and awning, all sorts of things that became possible because of the available machining of the composite panels. With that machining, this complex arrangement would have been a doddle to build - I expect it would have taken only days to build.

However, the chap in Queensland (a name something like "breezestopped") after approving my drawings just stopped responding to emails. I suspected that the claims on his website were too good to be true, and that is why I went to Qld to meet him. It seems my doubts were justified.

Anyway, to cut a long story short, without his complex machining skills my design was too complicated. Chopping up all those panels by hand would have been a nightmare, so I did the obvious and rationalised away the need for all those slide-outs and pop-tops.

As I see it, the benefits of a simple high roof fixed box are as follows:-
*The body is much stronger
*A fixed roof is lighter than a pop-top with its mechanism
* The fixed roof would actually result in a lower centre of gravity
* The high roof means that there can be an internally accessed toilet without the smells getting into the living area as would be the case with a pop-top
*The body would be strong enough to damp the 'wobbles' that the single cab gets as the chassis flexes
*In the event of trouble there is no packing up to do, just crawl into the cabin and drive off
*And of course, there is less to go wrong.

So I am starting again with a simple fixed body. I will lose some of the spaciousness inside that all the slide-outs made possible, but it will still be big enough to allow for a permanently made-up island bed (easy to make) a useful sized bathroom, usable dining table and seats, stove with oven and a large fridge/freezer.
I am pleased that my original plans were thwarted - I think my desire to show off with something fancy would have resulted in an overly complex, overly heavy camper that might have been more comfortable but would have resulted in a less 'driveable' vehicle.
Now I just need to find a suitable supplier of the composite panels....

Cheers all,

Paul
Oh, and if anyone wants any electrically operated rams, I have about a dozen of them that I now won't be using, going very cheap!

March 19, 2011 at 6:11 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
Having just cut the roof out of ours I doubt very much that the poptop would weigh more than the roof that was cut out. Two people struggled to lift the sheet of steel that came out and the Oka rose 50mm on its suspension with its removal. By comparison I can lift the new poptop roof by myself, the vinyl sleeve weighs bugger all as does the new frame fitted to the hole to take the poptop. The heaviest bits are the scissor lifts and they weigh less than the removed crossmembers.
As far as the body losing strength by removing the roof skin then that would be very minor, the sides didn't move even 1 mm when it was removed as I measured before and after, plus ours had rear barn doors so the entire rear is open with no crossbracing above the rear boot.
Our poptop design is a copy of John and Laura's 147 which has had many years of use without any problems.
Our queen bed is also permanently made up and slides out rearwards like Sue and Keith Harris' 191. Again they have done plenty of travelling in rough conditions with no probs.
Peter
--
Oka 374 LT Van

March 19, 2011 at 8:24 AM Flag Quote & Reply

oka 098
Member
Posts: 58
center of gravity lower ?
solid roof is lighter ?
my missus lifted our pop top roof up the side off the bus so i could fit it and she is 55kg .if lifted trees over roof rack a few times, now fitted tree bars down full lengh of pop top so i dont loose clamps ,you would want a solid high roof
March 19, 2011 at 12:53 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Our fixed, raised roof is made of aluminium tube and sheeting, and weighs about 40 kg with lining, insulation and fittings, plus I've recently added about 30 kg of solar panels. I didn't weigh the roof sheet and support bars that I removed, but they were extremely heavy (as Peter noted above) and I had to use a block and tackle to lift them off.
A side benefit of a raised (or pop-top) roof is that a full size roof rack (which itself is very heavy) can't be fitted, which means that stuff must be stored lower down and that must lower the centre of gravity (and make stuff easier to get at, spare wheels on a roof rack must be a nightmare to access).
We do have to watch the height carefully on bush tracks with overhanging branches but in 6 years we haven't sustained any serious damage to the raised roof, which is about the same height as a fully loaded roof rack would be. The solar panel frame over the cab provides some protection.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

March 19, 2011 at 2:15 PM Flag Quote & Reply

oka 098
Member
Posts: 58
fixed or pop top compared to roof rack yeah ,and a spare wheel on cab rack is good fun getting it up ,no room for two on the rear.
March 19, 2011 at 2:43 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
Sorry, I didn't make myself clear. When saying the pop-top would be heavier than a fixed roof, I was referring to a fixed composite roof, not the steel roof fitted as standard. Oka 059 is a single cab, not a bus body so the whole camper is to be built from scratch.
The pop-top would have roughly the same amount of total material, but would also need metal surround to give it strength, along with the lifting mechanism, lock-down catches etc.
I am quite sure it is possible, and easy, to make a successful slide-outbed etc, but I was getting too fancy. Everything was to be electrically driven, one button was to cause the roof to rise, the hard awning to raise, the bed to slide out, the bathroom to slide out etc. Probably the down-side of working as an electronic engineer, always wanting to over-design.....
Whatever, I am glad of the decision to keep it simple, even if it does mean that there will be occasional height problems. I read a previous post on the pop-top or not issue and that helped me decide.

Cheers all,

Paul
March 20, 2011 at 7:52 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Rick Whitworth
Member
Posts: 74
John & Laura Szkoruda at March 12, 2011 at 7:41 PM
Gee I like 023 ' s set up looks neat. Peter & Sandra that roof gutter & rib cage for the pop top look very familiar, looking good so far glad you could understand the drawings, dont know how Rick W is going with his. Ewart have answered you email, but if you can weld, have some mechanical ability and have lots of patience & not scared to cut BIG holes in your bus it isn't really that hard ( says us who have finished).. and the slide out looks good too. Look forward to seeing the finished bus.

John & Laura, Peter & Sandra,
Bit busy at work so still havent cut the hole in #149 roof yet. Windscreen and all windows still out ready for painting, Finished all of the cab, grill, doors, roof and headlining, almost finished rear kickout for bed, mods to windows, doors under bed and general bodywork.
Would like to use max possible roof area for solar and figure out secure waterproof method of fixing to your design so roof can carry panels with required space underneath to allow easy removal for cleaning.
Wonder if you or Peter & Sandra or any other pop top users have considered this.
Would you know roughly the total lift weight of your top, ie frame + skin + insulation + lining + canvas?
Also what is your lift height?
I prefer the pop-top option over fixed roof every time having used both types in motorhomes and off road campers Vs caravans over the years and your design is one of the best I have seen for the OKA
..just need to find the time!
cheers
Rick
March 20, 2011 at 9:49 PM Flag Quote & Reply

oka 098
Member
Posts: 58
Looking at that myself, thinking along the lines of a frame that runs down the center of poptop that can unplug and slide off back for access, just a weight issue, if need solar give Michael a call on 83451304, Nimbus Engineering, not much he doesn't know about 12 volt systems.
March 20, 2011 at 10:42 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
We're putting two 125w panels on the flat centre section of the poptop, probably one towards each end which will put the weight more over the scissor lifts. I will just mount them on angle fastened to the roof, the inner ends with pins into holes in the angle and the outer ends with bolts as it will be easy to access the outer ends.
There will be two more 125w panels over the cab roof completely covering it.
I've no idea of the weight of the completed roof yet as it hasn't been assembled, I can lift the completed actual roof frame by myself, once the aluminium skin goes on then I probably won't be able to but two people would be able to lift the completed roof easily. We have a 500mm lift which will give us nearly 2m inside.
--
Oka 374 LT Van

March 21, 2011 at 7:33 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Rick Whitworth
Member
Posts: 74
Pins on inner ends is a good idea
I hope to do the skin in one piece if possible fixed with sikaflex. Looking for some way of fixing the solar frame without putting holes in the skin.
Guess Sikaflex 252 should be enough
not an issue with the top because the skin will be aluminium over steel frame but I find sikaflex (old or new) is a real pain when you need to weld steel nearby, it burns and sends off horrible gas that stuffs the weld
Rick XT 148
March 21, 2011 at 2:30 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
I've been told by two different people that sikaflex will hold a 50x50x2 mm aluminium angle to the roof sufficient to carry the solar panels wtithout any problems at all. I think I'll still put a few 3/16 sealed pop rivets in each strip to hold them as well, shouldn't have any leaks with liberal application of sikaflex on the rivet bodies. Then with a couple of coats of Thermashield paint over the lot I doubt whether there could be any leaks.
--
Oka 374 LT Van

March 21, 2011 at 3:53 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Garry & Chris
Member
Posts: 104
However, the chap in Queensland (a name something like "breezestopped") after approving my drawings just stopped responding to emails. I suspected that the claims on his website were too good to be true, and that is why I went to Qld to meet him. It seems my doubts were justified.
Sounds like the guy I went to see to get some Indian four parts made. I asked how much for 1 he said $200 I said how much for 20 he said $200 I said ok do it. "Oh I can't do that for at least 18 months
March 21, 2011 at 6:32 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Cando
Member
Posts: 199
Peter,
We use sikaflex to hold automatic satellite dishes to the roofs of campers with out any probs. no screw only the sikaflex. this stuf sticks like poor to a blanket.

--
Happy trails

Cando and Bron XLT 112



March 21, 2011 at 9:11 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
Hi every one, does any one know how much the chassis flex? and is it better to attach to the existing mounts or to the chassis rail.

Ewart
September 2, 2011 at 7:08 PM


Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Like Paul, I'm in the process of building a full-height box on the back of 123. 2000 high, 2100 wide and 3600 long. All out of sandwich panel and no steel frame except for the subframe which is similar construction to that used under the coach body.

I messed around with the idea suggested by Peter that even the subframe was unnecessary and the box could be just about glued straight to the chassis rails with maybe a couple of strategic outriggers added here and there.

Problem is, seems to be impossible to get any definite figures on just how much the chassis flexes and the sandwich panel box is incredibly rigid. On the other hand, the rubber mounting system used to mount the body to the chassis is essentially rigid anyway. Look up the specs on the rubber buffers and you can see that any movement in compression is going to be 2/3 of 5/8 of nothing much at all so adding a sub frame is going to do much to accomodate chassis twist - although the lighter rubbers underneath will allow some upwards movement, even that isn't going to be more than a couple of mm.

Still, not quite game to follow Peters suggestion so will have a subframe.

I've opted for using the entire box as living area with a king-size fold-down platform hingeing down at the back. This means generous kitchen area, decent bathroom and a large comfortable dinette - plus a huge bed that can be left made up all the time. Lowered and raised by a small winch as a sop to my fairly wrecked back.

Ewart - email is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - if you want to get in touch.

Paul and I have been bouncing ideas off each other over the last month or so. Some of his ideas are really really terrible - like I should buy a really really expensive welder and learn to TIG weld and built my own frame so I wouldn't be held hostage by welding shops. Seemed a good idea at the time and I have the welder. Just need to learn how to use it.
Kidding of course. Welding has been on my to-learn list for 30 years so now is a good time to do it.

My panel will be 23mm thick FRP on each side with polyurethane foam inside. Paul may be looking at a different material for the core, but it is a lot more expensive.

All in all a good learning experience and by the time I get back home the panels and the steel (and the welder) will be sitting in a big pile ready for a couple of months of intensive work.





www.epicycles.com/Truck%20Blog/2010-01-01/2010-01-01.htm is a build blog of another composite panel build on a cantor chassis that needs a torsion free subframe not required on the OKA
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 3, 2011 at 3:04 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539



Having to fit a decent sized bed in is a real limitation and I looked at putting a rear slide out but that seemed to mandate lowering seat backs and tables, plus added another lot of weight and complexity - so I opted for the fold out bit at the back. Does introduce canvas, but I've solved problems with waterproofing it and although it isn't perfectly convenient to access it by skooting along the seats, it shouldn't be too bad

Essential requirement was that all the living area should be fully useable even when sleeping arrangements were set up. No ladder climbing and bed always ready to go were others as the need to be able to sleep evn if the bed couldn't be deployed.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 3, 2011 at 3:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
Tony
Looks good but having now spent a couple of months living in 374 since its completion I've got a couple of comments.
Our main criteria of 30+ years of outback travel with everything from swags, tents, rooftop tents to hardfloor camper trailers was that a) we could go inside and shut the door when weather conditions are poor for whatever reason.
b) that there be NO canvas
c) a decent innerspring mattress (we have a queen size)
d) that it could be opened/closed from inside without going out in the rain/whatever (this is ok for the actual poptop and slideout but the addition of the standard Ok rear tyre carrier requires going outside to open/close it)
e)that if necessary we could sleep without opening anything (so the vehicle looks like it is just parked)
374 has achieved all of the above with the poptop and slideout as the poptop is locked down internally as is the slideout. So we can close up from inside, just the need to shut the tyre carrier externally.
The design doesn't let dust in despite several thousand k's of rough corrugated road this trip. We did have a dust problem where it sucked up the rear drain tubes but a plastic tap sorted that out.
It is cosy and doesn't leak anywhere despite several big storms and trvaelling in steady rain for a week at one stage.
In your design do you have any storage? for items like chairs, tools etc? 374 has a boot space of approx 450x1400x1000 accessible from the rear under the slideout/bed for all the stuff like chairs, tools, spares, winch etc etc.
I think you may find the extra height above the cab to be a problem in tight overgrown areas, despite what Peter says I think the extra height and width would restrict access.
--
Oka 374 LT Van

September 3, 2011 at 8:32 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Good points but I think my setup answers them too

a) No point in being able to go inside when the weather is bad if it means huddling there in uncomfortable seats and getting in each other's way.. Stop on the side of the road, open the door and have the kettle on in 30 seconds and sit down in comfort, all without bending over..
b) No canvas is good - and I achieve that ideal in the other three vehicles and while the Hobby does pretty well in getting me in crazy places, it wouldn't get me across the Simpson. Well maybe along the rig road. Canvas is light, lightproof and weatherproof. A good material allround. Does present problems in very cold weather but there is a 4kW heater installed and electric blankets and we can always leave the bed platform up if the weather is really bad. We struck really high winds with the current trayon-design camper and the canvas never gave us any trouble.
c) King size is better and provided the foam is the correct density, I haven't found any downsides to a 4" foam mattress. Upside is less cost and less weight.
d) agreed. Undo a couple of catches inside, give a gentle push and let the winch lower it into position. Bed is ready to go. No changing seating or living arrangements. Do have to go outside to actually get in the camper door though because I chose not to have a crawl through - because they never get used and because they really mess up options for planning both the front cab and the living area.Also have to go outside to set up the satellite internet dish and the satellite TV but that can always wait until the rain stops.
e) Ours is a desert travel vehicle so our need for stealth-camping is much less than with the other vehicles, however I did think of that so the mattresses (being flexible light foam can be dragged out on the floor and we can have a cosy night. I still might make the table adjustable so it drops to the seat level and becomes a double bed if necessary

Extra height above the cab - yes, thought long and hard about being able to lower it, but in the end decided not to bother for a couple of reasons. One, we live in our vehicles full time and although there are some disadvantages of my design, it is hard to argue with a 6 metre x 2.1 x 2m metre living space. Two, my other vehicles are 12' high and it is very rare to need to worry about it. Simpson doesn't have many trees and most places don't either. Occasionally might have to back up and go around but that is part of the adventure. Peter doesn't seem to have been too concerned about it, so I figure no need for me to be either. Three, poptops often end up heavier than an equivalent full-height van and the extra wind resistance isn't so much a factor in off-road situations.

Storage? Most of it isn't apparent from that drawing. Right across the back is full-width storage about 550 wide and 225 high accessed from either side. Above that is the underseat space 550 wide, 400 high and 600 deep on each side also accessed from those doors. Next to the bathroom is a full-height cupboard 670 deep and 300 wide. The kitchen cupboards have 12 x 25 litre drawers (Actually willow plastic bins - light and indestructable), the corner space with external door will be about 500 high and 600 deep x 500 wide above the calorifier. Also a space along the floor under the kitchen bench about 200 high, some of which will house water, plumbing and electrical stuff, and under one of the fridges is another space 300 high x 650 wide x 550 deep. Nearly all the spares will fit in behind the narrow space between the outside wall and the dinette seat backs and normal fold up chairs, highlift jack, sand mats and shovels and recovery gear will fit in the rear lower space. Tool boxes under the fridge, 400 litre water tanks are under the dinette and after all my junk is in place, there are still those 12 x 25L (or is it 27L) drawers plus the cupboard -- and of course, not shown are the full length 300mm x 300 overhead cupboard on one side and the 1200mm long one on the other side which will take all the clothing and light stuff. If I fill all of that up the poor old OKA won't get up little red let alone big red, so the aim is to have most of it as empty as possible.

Spare tyre stays where it is under the back and another unmounted tyre will go on the cab roof.

Over-height and width are restricting but my experience is they are rarely going to force you to turn back provided you have a fairly fatalistic view about minor damage to the paintwork. I cultivated that 40 years ago when my range rover ended up scratched and dented from stem to stern and the state of the current vehicles bears that out. I don't bush bash from scratch but have no worries about making things just a little wider on my way through. Few scratches and the bush springs back and no harm is done. Scratches add character and campground credibility

Been having a look around the RV yards here and caravans and slidons sometimes have some nice arrangements for slidouts. One I saw today had a decent double bed slidout from the rear that looked good. Heavy, and needed furniture rearrangement to get it back in - and made the eating area unusable, so wouldn't have worked all that well in the OKA even if I was prepared to sort out the engineering aspects which I'm not. Trying to fit a queensize (absolute minimum) bed anywhere inside the small space we have available involves too many compromises to be considered. You have used a slideout, but I was always concerned about the cost, weight, complexity and durability so opted for a less convenient, but essentially equivalent solution.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 3, 2011 at 9:47 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
Great information there guys, really thorough. I'm sure this will be of benefit to many more owners in years to come.

I don't know that this relevant to anybody, but there are some construction pics of an all-aluminium box body on a Canter here.


--
Hal

September 3, 2011 at 12:42 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
Great post guys. I have not heard of a bus body or camper cracking or barn doors leaking dust so it does appear that the chassis on an OKA does not twist.
Ewart
September 3, 2011 at 6:03 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
Ewart & Vivian Halford at September 3, 2011 at 6:03 PM
Great post guys. I have not heard of a bus body or camper cracking or barn doors leaking dust so it does appear that the chassis on an OKA does not twist.
Ewart
Hi Ewart,
I think the chassis does flex a bit, but the bus bodies tend to be strong enough to prevent it being noticed. I did quite a bit of testing with my tray still fitted, and I am convinced there was movement in the chassis.
I mounted a rigid jig on the tray with an outrigger that extended to outside the drivers window. Driving over rough terrain, the outrigger was moving for and aft in an arc by about 30mm. I think the chassis was flexing at the section between the forward mount of the tray and the rear mount of the cab.
It is nothing like the rubber 'C' chassis of an Isuzu or Canter, but there is some movement and if the camper body can be made strong enough to prevent this, it wll result in a more comfortable ride.
I have made a lot of changes to my design as a result of swapping of emails with Tony. It is incredibly useful just writing about plans and having other folk commenting. I am wondering if maybe each of us who are building campers should put our ideas up on our own threads, and invite others to comment. The threads could be called "Tony's Camper" or "Pauls Camper" etc.
I would be glad to start the ball rolling if someone could tell me how to post pdf's on this site - if that is possible?
Cheers all,
Paul (Oka 059)
September 5, 2011 at 7:46 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Paul, yes it is possible to upload PDF's and other documents. It's in "Documents" under the Home menu item.
You should be able to upload documents there, or if not any Administrator could do it for you.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

September 5, 2011 at 9:09 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
Dandj at September 5, 2011 at 9:09 AM
Paul, yes it is possible to upload PDF's and other documents. It's in "Documents" under the Home menu item.
You should be able to upload documents there, or if not any Administrator could do it for you.
Thanks David,
I will start a new thread under "Oka 059 Camper" and see how I go.
Cheers
Paul
September 5, 2011 at 11:40 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
"I mounted a rigid jig on the tray with an outrigger that extended to outside the drivers window. Driving over rough terrain, the outrigger was moving for and aft in an arc by about 30mm. I think the chassis was flexing at the section between the forward mount of the tray and the rear mount of the cab."

If I understand your setup, this would have been measuring bending of the rear part of the chassis in a vertical direction as if there was a big hinge across the chassis just behind the cab. Also were you able to differentiate between movement in the chassis and movement of the drivers cab which would give the perception of more flex than there really was.

More I think about it the more I think even the 3 x 2 RHS frame we are using is a fair bit of overkill - if only because our box even full of all the gear is not going to be as heavy as a bus body with 12 people sitting in it. Trouble is some frame IS required, and the extra weight of 3 x 2 vs 2 x 2 isn't really worth bothering about.
I would have thought the worst sort of flexiing for our box would be twisting like a corkscrew
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 8, 2011 at 4:49 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
<"If I understand your setup, this would have been measuring bending of the rear part of the chassis in a vertical direction as if there was a big hinge across the chassis just behind the cab">
Hi Tony,
Yes, that is exactly what I think is happening. I tightened all the mounts on both the cab and the tray for the test. There is a length of about 750mm between the rear cab mount and the front tray mount, and I think that is where the "hinge" is located. I also built up a jig that ran a triangle from the top of the cab to the middle of the tray, and this got rid of most of the cabin wobbles.
Agreed about the chassis size, way overkill, but to allow for the full wheel travel the floor of the camper needs to be 100mm above the Oka chassis, so 25mm for the mounting rubbers plus 75mm for the camper chassis is just right.
I think you are right about the 'cork-screwing'. The difference between jacking up one wheel statically and dynamically bashing that wheel up by hitting it against a rock at 80KPH is hard to visualise. I guess this will be a bit of a trial and error exercise. I hope the 'error' bit doesn't manifest itself in the middle of the Gunbarrel Highway......
Cheers all, Paul
September 8, 2011 at 7:27 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Yes, have to laugh at the essentially static tests you see conducted as if that is the end of the matter. Can look at those couple of videos of Peter's (one going down a rocky trail, and the other going through the big puddle) and wonder at the dynamic forces being transmitted through the structure looking for something to break.

As for the so-called torsion-free mountings mandated by the flexible chasses, seems that unless a lot of extra load-sharing devices are added (like the intermediate springs in Julian's rig), all that happens is that one short section of the chassis cops all the stress and eventually breaks.

75 x 50 is the go then. I wondered because Peter has wheel arches but maybe that is to accomodate different tyres, but I thought his chassis was also 75 x 50 - although perhaps they are lying on their side.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 9, 2011 at 7:04 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Spoke too soon about Julian's sub frame mounting.

Latest news in his blog

"About this time the routine inspection revealed that the sub-frame had split. Just in front of the rear pivot support.
It looks like the spare tyres were being held on by Sikaflex and fiberglass with a bit of help from the main pivot.."

and

"About this time the routine inspection revealed that the sub-frame had split. Just in front of the rear pivot support."

www.epicycles.com/Truck%20Blog/2011-09-06/2011-09-06.php


--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 9, 2011 at 8:11 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Ewart & Vivian Halford
Member
Posts: 117
Thanks guys, this is good info that i am sure a lot of us will somthing out of. In my case most of the work will be out sourced so it pays to know the real facts about things to get what you want. The OKA beeing an OKA people tend to not believe what you say and see it as just another truck as far as confort and lack of chassis twist.
So it may make a huge differance if you had a body that was not conected to the drivers cab as compeard to one thas was.

Ewart
September 9, 2011 at 9:54 PM Flag Quote & Reply

James & Usha (THEByleDuct)
Administrator
Posts: 161
Tony - what thickness 75 x 50 RHS are you talking about - 2, 2.5, 3mm?? I'm in the planning stages still but getting closer to starting as my workshop is almost ready.
--
OKA #072

September 9, 2011 at 10:30 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
"So it may make a huge differance if you had a body that was not conected to the drivers cab as compeard to one thas was."

Yes, but all of the OKA bodies are connected firmly to the cab so perhaps the huge difference would be in the negative direction. For instance, people have reported that an OKA with just the drivers cab can be pretty uncomfortable to ride in because of fore and aft movement of the cabin. Perhaps caused by defective rubber mountings but they are designed to allow movement (especially the bottom smaller rubbers) so given the relatively short length of the body, a 5mm movement in a rubber translates to 10mm fore and aft and that could be a bit disconcerting. Bolting the back bodies to the cab stops that movement completely.

I probably won't be bolting the box to the cab - because that would require adding metal stiffening to the interior skins to spread the bolt load - but intend mounting the box say 5mm back from the cab and then when it is all finished and loaded up, squirting adhesive ito the gap so it penetrates up to 40mm. I figure that way it will be held better than with bolts and can be cut with a knife or saw if I ever needed to get the box off.


Thickness of 75 x 50 RHS.

Pretty sure Paul and Peter used 4mm but I will likely go the next one thinner if it is available. As Paul says, main reason for 75 x 50 is to avoid the need for wheel arches (although Peter has them) and while it might seem as if the steel frame is providing support to the box, I would suggest it is the other way around - and is one of the reasons why it would be good to be able to get some figures for dynamic flex of the chassis. Our box is just about totally rigid especially compared to the metal cabs and bus bodies.

Rudi - in NT001 used a German-built box and the standard rubber mountings and found some damage occuring presumably because of flex (perhaps induced because of his rig being considerably heavier than any of ours (8 tonne + ???)) and his fix was to fit longer bolts and two of the smaller lower rubbers instead of one. This allows the frame to lift upwards a little more so reducing the stresses induced by chassis twist. Of course the problem could be caused by weakness in the box construction, so even that info doesn't help us much..
My calculations - based on known weight of panel and other components, but also drawing on known weight of my current rig which ends up just a bit over gross weight 5700kg with everything including humans loaded - suggest that the new version will weigh very close to 5 tonnes with nearly 300 litres of water, nearly 300 litres diesel, two (overweight) people and all spares and provisions. Getting rid of the crew cab and the tray contributes most of the saving and I'm hoping the half-tonne reduction will make a reasonable difference.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 10, 2011 at 2:26 AM Flag Quote & Reply

James & Usha (THEByleDuct)
Administrator
Posts: 161
"I probably won't be bolting the box to the cab - because that would require adding metal stiffening to the interior skins to spread the bolt load - but intend mounting the box say 5mm back from the cab and then when it is all finished and loaded up, squirting adhesive ito the gap so it penetrates up to 40mm. I figure that way it will be held better than with bolts and can be cut with a knife or saw if I ever needed to get the box off."
I'm working on a similar strategy with our box as we do not need a crawl through. Do you think with the back and forth movement of the cab 5mm is enough at the heighest point? With my twin cab there is a 70mm gap between the cab and the tray. I wasn't sure whether this was due to cab movement or what?
--
OKA #072

September 10, 2011 at 9:49 AM Flag Quote & Reply

joseph baz
Member
Posts: 331
James, the rails of the bus body are 75x50x2,the bolt load is spread over the front frame as the spacers welded to the front frame bolts hard against the cab,if you not planing to sell the extra cab you can allways cut the front frame and incorporate it to the motorhome body.
Cheers,Joe
September 10, 2011 at 6:30 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter_n_Margaret
Member
Posts: 198
My box chassis main rails are 75 x 50 x 3, on edge Outer dimensions copied exactly from the bus body..
#196 has wheel arches which are the same length and height as the bus body but are wider (go from the box chassis out full width, just because it was easier that way).
--
Cheers Peter, OKA196 Motorhome. www.oka4wd.com/xt196.htm



September 10, 2011 at 8:31 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
James, I think our box is more similar to the full bus body than a tray, and the bus body is bolted solidly to the drivers cab in exactly the same way as the crew cab is so there is absolutely no allowance for any movement between the two. If you are keeping the crew cab, then gluing the box to the back of the crew cab (with window removed and replaced with ply) is still very little different since the box and the crew cab become one unit.
If you intend to make the box removable then I guess you could allow a bit more clearance and maybe stuff some closed cell foam between the two to provide a little extra damping and support.

Been a while since I removed the rear window but doesn't it project rewards a couple of inches. If so, that would explain some of the extra space between the tray and the cabin.

Thanks Peter - you told me the size of your RHS before but I had forgotten. 75 x 50 x 3 it is then and if I can get away with using 50 x 50 or 50 x 25 on edge for any intermediate sections I will.


Was thinking (as one does when a tiny bit bored with fierce wildlife, sweeping glaciers, snow-capped mountains and endless forests ablaze with the colours of autumn)) that it wouldn't be too hard to turn the fixed box into a slide-one - but of course having come up with that brilliant thought,I couldn't for the life of me come up with a single good reason why one would wan't to leave the box in one position and drive off in a bare-chassis OKA. Always having our living quarters with us is what it is all about.


--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 11, 2011 at 6:40 AM


Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
<<.....it wouldn't be too hard to turn the fixed box into a slide-one - but of course having come up with that brilliant thought,I couldn't for the life of me come up with a single good reason why one would want to leave the box in one position and drive off in a bare-chassis OKA. Always having our living quarters with us is what it is all about.>>>

There is a fabulous reason for doing it that way - no engineering required. A slide-on is just a load, and the Oka is still just a truck. No petty bullying bureaucrats telling us that for a motorhome we must have high exhausts and who knows what other insanities?

I am seriously considering ways and means of making it look like a slide-on.
September 11, 2011 at 8:08 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Trouble is I think it would only be accepted if the slide-on slid onto an original configuration vehicle - meaning the tray would need to be there - and since that weight about half a tonne ....

There is another solution of course.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 12, 2011 at 3:02 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
I have used 75 x 50 x 4mm for my chassis, seems like it might be over-kill. In a way, the extra weight may not be so bad, because it helps keep the centre of gravity low. I know the odd Oka has fallen over, and that would be a really, really nasty thing!
Tony, is the other solution the obvious ones of either not bothering or bothering with engineering?
September 12, 2011 at 8:22 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
I think one of bothering or not bothering would be a possibility
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 13, 2011 at 2:25 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Another question that may be of interest to others.

I was going to put 10 single brackets on the subframe to match up with those on the chassis - and I know one builder who has done the same. Another has used the same single/double combination as is used on the coach body.

My reasoning is that my box plus the subframe is never going to be as heavy as a fully-loaded coach so no need for any double mounts. Trouble is the other builder used a similar argument to decide that double mounts were necessary.

Any other thoughts.

Pretty sure the crewcab body and the tray on mine (XT 123) only use single mounts but can't confirm that at the moment and would like to order the brackets so they are there waiting for when I get home.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 16, 2011 at 2:57 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
The tray on my single cab had doubles on the forward most mount only. Interestingly they were upside down compared to the others, giving differential support in the other direction.
Why not fit the double brackets and decide on the number of rubbers to deploy later?
Cheers, Paul
September 16, 2011 at 7:44 AM Flag Quote & Reply

joseph baz
Member
Posts: 331
Tony,have a look at the MACKAY rubber catalogue for the mountig max loading
Cheers,Joe
September 16, 2011 at 8:14 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
emags.newlitho.com.au/?mackayconsolidate...ue/flexibleisolators
Available from Blackwoods.
September 16, 2011 at 9:42 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
OK thanks. In the meantime I've heard back from Allan at OKA that indeed, one of the brackets is "upside down" and is a double.

Two doubles and 8 singles it is then,

FYI, Allan quoted
Double $39.00 ea, Single $18.00 ea, both include GST, plus freight

--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 17, 2011 at 1:22 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Those who have been following Julian's journey across Asia and Russia to Europe will know that he is now sharing his living quarters with two very large, very heavy spare wheels.

Good lesson for those of us contemplating hanging two spares off the back up high.

I never intended to and Paul isn't either - and Peter has obviously gotten away with it for many years, but it is something to take into account.even though our OKAs are "different".

Julian's subframe has cracked (behind the pivot) and been repaired as well as possible, but once the box has been glued to the subframe, it isn't real easy to get at the top surface of the beam without cutting a hole in the floor

There are extenuating circumstances - previous owner had shortened the chassis meaning the subchassis had to have a longer overhang past the rear pivot point, and Julian had to swap tyres for much bigger heavier ones because of engineer requirements.

Didn't Rudi have problems in NT001 too??
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 27, 2011 at 9:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Paul Scherek
Member
Posts: 136
In my very limited experience, the Canters seem to have unbearably harsh suspension and I suspect this is why they are having more breakages than those of us lucky enough to use Okas as our base.
I received a phone call from a chap yesterday following up an old ad for my Land Rover camper. He had previously used a Land Rover but sold it and bought a Canter for the extra space. He said that after two years he couldn't trust the reliability or put up with the suspension any more, so wanted another Land Rover.
I tried to suggest an Oka, but I don't think he really believed me that the leaf springs on an Oka didn't give a similar ride to the Canter. Pity, he seemed like a nice bloke who went to some serious out of the way places. At least he is going for another Land Rover, not a Toyota!
September 29, 2011 at 9:19 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
I've been reading Julian's blog too and while I've no experience of the roads he's travelling I'm amazed at the relatively low travelling speeds in the Canter. The pics of the roads seem to me to be very similar to a lot of our outback tracks/roads and travels speeds are much higher on Oz tracks. We have learnt though that dips in the Oka need to be slowed for ;-)))
Sometimes his travel speeds on what look to be relatively good cross country tracks are what we would be doing on trackless cross country trips.
--
Oka 374 LT Van

September 29, 2011 at 1:09 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter_n_Margaret
Member
Posts: 198
Julian's suspension is standard Canter TRUCK.
He does have suspension seats tho, which may just mask the harshness of the ride,
--
Cheers Peter, OKA196 Motorhome. www.oka4wd.com/xt196.htm



September 29, 2011 at 8:22 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
He mentioned the good seats being possibly a problem and he did have to do work on the spare wheel mounts after his 5 month trip in Australia. I've only driven a Canter-type once, and that was with the modified suspension and 4.5T Gross weight configuration and that was bad enough on normal suburban sealed roads.

Those looking for interesting ways of crossing a wide river should have a look at
www.epicycles.com/Truck%20Blog/2011-09-19/2011-09-19.php

half way and 2/3rds the way down the page.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 30, 2011 at 2:32 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Now that I have started building the new box - my welding skills are progressing well and the panels will be here next week - I've had some changes of mind about how best to ensure that the box and the cab act as one rigid structure as per original OKA design philosophy.
Original thoughts were just to have the front of the box and the rear of the cabin about 4mm apart and squirt a bead of adhessive right around the perimeter. Spread the load over a large part of the fibreglass panel skin and still be able to separate them if necessary.

Once I started pulling the old rig apart, I realised that I could easily copy the factory connection at the bottom - but rejected that because it would mean having the bolts right down near the floor in the bathroom.

Finally settled on simply drilling 4 holes in the front beam of the box sub frame through the rear bottom beam of the cab and bolting them together with some closed cell foam between as per original OKA method. 4 x 10mm HT bolts with very big thick washers to prevent the thin cab material from collapsing.

As for the top. Probably still go for a bead of adhesive all around the perimeter, plus an aluminium angle flashing between the wall of the box and the roof/sides of the drivers cabin. I'll probably mark the positions of the top two pairs of fixing holes just in case the outer sking of the box starts to delaminate. Then I would glue a large thick plate on the inside of the front wall and bolt through it to the 4 OKA connecting points.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

November 9, 2011 at 10:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
Tony 374 was leaking between the cabin and bus body as the closed cell foam had broken down and gone crumbly. I dug as much out as I could, cleaned it with acetone and then filled the gap with Sikaflex, no more leaks.
It has pulled a bit on the drivers side down low after the last 12k kilometres probably due to me not cleaning the bus body side properly.
--
Oka 374 LT Van

November 10, 2011 at 7:08 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Shayne & Jo
Member
Posts: 2
Cando at March 11, 2011 at 7:34 PM
Hi Ewart
As you can see from our pics we are rebuilding 112. Once the rebuild is complete we will be looking to build a 'camper ' type back. We are looking at the option of using a slide on type, this way its ready in minutes and we can still utilise the tray. The back will probably have legs that fall down to take the load when you drive away or a hydraulic set up run off the PTO. I've looked at different types but not sure quite how to do it yet. I'm keen to use alloy for the internals as much as practicable, not sure about the main frame though.
cheers
Hi Cando, How did you go with your slide-on? We're in the middle of doing the same with our Mitsubishi Canter 4WD and am interested in ideas incl. fixing to the chassis. Tossing up a few ways but have found nothing that seems "just right".
Shayne & Jo
September 9, 2012 at 1:48 PM Flag Quote & Reply

joseph baz
Member
Posts: 331
Shayne, the fixing on to a Canter is very different to the fixing to an OKA due to the extreme twisting allowed by the Canter's chassis, the OKA chassis is very rigid and if you mount the Canter in the same manner lots of stress fractures will appear on the camper body. I will suggest you take a peek at the Earth Cruiser or All Terrain Warriors mounting systems.
Cheers,Joe
September 9, 2012 at 5:23 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Shayne & Jo
Member
Posts: 2
No Worries Joe, will take a look.
September 9, 2012 at 5:44 PM

David and Janet Ribbans - Oka 148
Oka148 profile here.
Visit our technical and travel blogs: here.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Powered by Kunena Forum