Putting my 123 chassis on a diet

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02 Nov 2012 21:04 #1 by dandjcr
dandjcr created the topic: Putting my 123 chassis on a diet
Forum Home > On the Road > Putting my 123 chassis on a diet

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
Now that Alice is just about wine-cask-free - and a lot of the outback pubs only carry the realroughred or extraacidicwhite, I need to get rid of some weight to make up for the 15 casks I'll have to carry to get me through the centre.


Seems to me that the two outriggers right at the rear of the chassis are only there to carry a bumper bar for the bus body.


Any reason why they ccouldn't be amputated a couple of cm outboard of the chassis rail??


Maybe save 10kg total.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

November 6, 2011 at 3:37 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter_n_Margaret
Member
Posts: 198
I cut mine off flush with the chassis.
Dumped the bash plate and built an aluminium channel one. 25kg + plus saved.
I also replaced all the mud flaps with 5mm HDPE sheet. Indestructable and probably another 10kg +.
More recently I built my own towbar. Better, stronger, lighter (about 30kg saved).
Notwithstanding what Markus says there is a lot of surplus weight to be saved.
--
Cheers Peter, OKA196 Motorhome. www.oka4wd.com/xt196.htm



November 6, 2011 at 6:46 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
Knew you had cut yours off and intend to do the same provided noone comes up with a compelling reason to keep the outriggers. Guess they could provide a small amount of extra protection for part of the rear part of the subframe, but not much since my box is 2100mm wide, way wider than the outriggers.
Mudflaps - yes, with the shape of the body, might be that you don't legally need any, but of course they do help keep mud under control.
Probably never need the towbar, but it is a good aanchor point to get pulled out of a bog backwards so it will stay for now. Just leave the massive ball and pintle structure at home.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

November 6, 2011 at 8:24 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 413
Can't chop them off if the tyre carrier is mounted to the rear corners though ;-))
As Peter says though the bodies themselves are very heavy, Sandra and I are unable to lift the roof sheet that we cut out of the centre of the original roof (it was cut 75 in from the edge all around) By comparison the replacement pop top roof with two 125w solar panels, 25mm of insulation, four coats of thermal paint and the ceiling panel is lighter and can easily be lifted by two people. The whole thing with four scissor lifts, two gas struts, interior lights and the vinyl sleeve for the poptop weighs about the same as the original roof sheet.

--
Oka 374 LT Van

November 6, 2011 at 8:28 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
My spare will sit underneath in the original location and an unmounted tyre will go on the driver's cab roof.. Not really a fan of carrying two huge weights cantilevered off the back of anything, and anyway, the sleeping platform folds down from the back.

I'm starting afresh with a single cab and bare chassis so would like to get every kg possible off. Previous rig with the trayon-type camper box, crew cab and tray was 5.7 tonnes with everything loaded for a long trip. Legal, but too much. Getting rid of those three big items and replacing it with a steel sub frame with sandwich panel box has the potential to reduce the weight by at least 600kg which is good, but even less would be better.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

November 6, 2011 at 11:13 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
Decided to just cut off the short bits that sweep forward. The transverse bit seemed a good place to mount the rear lights. Have to read the ADR a bit more carefully but the position should comply and should be fairly well protected.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

November 9, 2011 at 9:53 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
Peter, did you remove the bull bar part of the front bumper, or wasn't it fitted inthe first place.
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

November 13, 2011 at 10:32 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter_n_Margaret
Member
Posts: 198
Don't know hat you mean Tony, so I guess it was not there.
I did cut the centre 500mm out of the front bumper so I could fit my winch in higher.
--
Cheers Peter, OKA196 Motorhome. www.oka4wd.com/xt196.htm



November 14, 2011 at 5:40 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 510
>> Dumped the bash plate and built an aluminium channel one. <<

Tony, the bash plate is seriously heavy. Recalling your aversion to driving at night, you probably don't really need a steel one and would save weight by following Peter's example here.

I've reduced the roo population by one every year or two, so thought it best to keep a steel one. However my factory original was bent, stone chipped and rusty where the finish had been taken off, so I wanted a prettier one. I was stunned at how much the original weighed, and it was a bit of a challenge to remove. Yours would probably be identical - all one big welded concoction, frame and bash plate. In a fit of genius it occurred to me that it would be smarter to have made it in two pieces, separate frame and plate, as re-fitting it would be much easier, and you could remove just the plate to make access better from underneath when necessary.

Then I was down at the factory one day and noticed that I wasn't the only genius around, because they were already doing that with NTs. I don't know if it was also done with later LTs. In the end mine was done in three pieces, a frame, a bash plate with full-length angle irons so that it didn't bend (the originals aren't full length for the sake of those with a factory winch), and a stainless outer skin.


--
Hal

November 17, 2011 at 12:57 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 540
Bash plate is on my list Hal, but fairly well down.

I had been carrying the 4 sand mats on the bullbar and they are also very heavy.

The step under the fuel tanks is redundant now and I realized that if I tipped the step upside down to make a channel, two sand mats fit in perfectly. Couple of ratchet straps around them and the fuel tank and it looks as if it was made for the job.
Bright orange sand mats look good there too and I won't have to get them chrome plated after all.

Sandwich panels arrived tonight which is pretty good timing as the subframe is finished tonight also.

Probably need to wait until it is all finished to see what the weight distribution is like before I start worrying about getting rid of a few extra kilos, especially since the bash plate is in perfect condition and would be a waste to get rid of it.
(what was the original cost of the bash plate as an optional extra?)
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

November 17, 2011 at 9:19 PM

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